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Immigration, unemployment and GDP in the host country: Bootstrap panel Granger causality analysis on OECD countries

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  • Ekrame Boubtane
  • Dramane Coulibaly
  • Christophe Rault

Abstract

This paper examines the causality relationship between immigration, Unemployment and economic growth of the host country. We employ the panel Granger causality testing approach of Kónya (2006) that is based on SUR systems and Wald tests with country specific bootstrap critical values. This approach does not assume that the panel is homogeneous and it allows to detect for how many and for which countries of the panel there exists one-way Granger-causality, two-way Granger-causality or no Granger-causality, and takes into account for possible contemporaneous dependence across countries. Using annual data over the period 1980-2005 for 22 OECD countries, we find that, only in Portugal, unemployment negatively causes immigration, while in any country, immigration does not cause unemployment. On the other hand, our results show that, in four countries (France, Iceland, Norway and United Kingdom), growth positively causes immigration, while in any country, immigration does not cause growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Ekrame Boubtane & Dramane Coulibaly & Christophe Rault, 2011. "Immigration, unemployment and GDP in the host country: Bootstrap panel Granger causality analysis on OECD countries," Working Papers 2011-29, CEPII research center.
  • Handle: RePEc:cii:cepidt:2011-29
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    Cited by:

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    2. Esposito, Piero & Collignon, Stefan & Scicchitano, Sergio, 2019. "Immigration and unemployment in Europe: does the core-periphery dualism matter?," GLO Discussion Paper Series 310, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    3. Ali Fakih & May Ibrahim, 2016. "The impact of Syrian refugees on the labor market in neighboring countries: empirical evidence from Jordan," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 64-86, February.
    4. Marcus H. Böhme & Sarah Kups, 2017. "The economic effects of labour immigration in developing countries: A literature review," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 335, OECD Publishing.
    5. Latif, Ehsan, 2015. "The relationship between immigration and unemployment: Panel data evidence from Canada," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 162-167.
    6. Driouchi, Ahmed & Harkat, Tahar, 2017. "Granger Causality and the Factors underlying the Role of Younger Generations in Economic, Social and Political Changes in Arab Countries," MPRA Paper 77218, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Lozej, Matija, 2019. "Economic migration and business cycles in a small open economy with matching frictions," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 604-620.
    8. Coulibaly, Dramane, 2015. "Remittances and financial development in Sub-Saharan African countries: A system approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 249-258.
    9. Alena Andrejovska & Veronika Pulikova, 2018. "Tax Revenues in the Context of Economic Determinants," Montenegrin Journal of Economics, Economic Laboratory for Transition Research (ELIT), vol. 14(1), pages 133-141.
    10. Joan Muysken & Thomas Ziesemer, 2014. "The Effect of Immigration on Economic Growth in an Ageing Economy," Bulletin of Applied Economics, Risk Market Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 35-63.
    11. Dmitry Burakov, 2017. "Oil Prices, Economic Growth and Emigration: An Empirical Study of Transmission Channel," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 7(1), pages 90-98.
    12. Eszter Siposné Nándori & Zsuzsanna Dabasi-Halász & Csaba Ilyés, 2018. "“Action and Reaction” – the Impact of European Youth Mobility on the Economy and the Labour Market," Eastern European Business and Economics Journal, Eastern European Business and Economics Studies Centre, vol. 4(1 - speci), pages 56-78.
    13. Wolde-Rufael, Yemane, 2014. "Electricity consumption and economic growth in transition countries: A revisit using bootstrap panel Granger causality analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 325-330.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; GROWTH; unemployment; Granger causality;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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