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The Labor Market Effects of Immigration

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  • George E. Johnson

Abstract

This paper is a theoretical examination of the probable effects on the U.S. labor market of a continued high rate of illegal immigration. The author constructs a model to estimate the impact each additional immigrant has on the employment of the domestic population, on GNP, and on the distribution of income. The model suggests that in non-recessionary periods the most important effect of a high rate of immigration is on the wage rates of low-skilled labor rather than on the employment of low-skilled native workers, but immigration also increases the earnings of high-skilled workers and the owners of capital. In the very long run, the author concludes, this redistribution of income will be offset to some extent by increases in the supplies of skilled labor and capital.

Suggested Citation

  • George E. Johnson, 1980. "The Labor Market Effects of Immigration," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 33(3), pages 331-341, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:33:y:1980:i:3:p:331-341
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. David Card, 2005. "Is the New Immigration Really so Bad?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(507), pages 300-323, November.
    2. Jean-François Maystadt & Valerie Mueller & Ashwini Sebastian, 2016. "Environmental Migration and Labor Markets in Nepal," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, pages 417-452.
    3. Chletsos, Michael & Roupakias, Stelios, 2016. "Do Immigrants Compete with Natives in the Greek Labour Market? Evidence from the Skill-Cell Approach Before and During the Great Recession," MPRA Paper 75659, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Joseph G. Altonji & David Card, 1989. "The Effects of Immigration on the Labor Market Outcomes of Natives," NBER Working Papers 3123, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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