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Vietnamese Manicurists: Are Immigrants Displacing Natives or Finding New Nails to Polish?

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  • Maya N. Federman
  • David E. Harrington
  • Kathy J. Krynski

Abstract

Although many people believe that immigrants displace native workers, most economic research finds that immigration has little or no adverse effect on natives' employment outcomes. An unusual opportunity to explore this question in the context of a narrowly defined labor market is afforded by the influx of Vietnamese immigrants into California's market for manicurists. Over the years 1987–2002, the number of these new entrants (35, 700) slightly exceeded the total number of manicurists in California in 1987 (35, 500). Using data for 34 metropolitan areas over the 16-year period, the authors estimate that for every five Vietnamese who entered the market, two non-Vietnamese were displaced. This displacement appears to have been primarily due to a reduction in the number of non-Vietnamese entering the occupation rather than to an increase in the number of current manicurists leaving it.

Suggested Citation

  • Maya N. Federman & David E. Harrington & Kathy J. Krynski, 2006. "Vietnamese Manicurists: Are Immigrants Displacing Natives or Finding New Nails to Polish?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 59(2), pages 302-318, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:59:y:2006:i:2:p:302-318
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    Cited by:

    1. Bodvarsson, Örn B. & Van den Berg, Hendrik F. & Lewer, Joshua J., 2008. "Measuring immigration's effects on labor demand: A reexamination of the Mariel Boatlift," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 560-574, August.
    2. Jeanne Lafortune & José Tessada, 2012. "Smooth(er) Landing? The Dynamic Role of Networks in the Location and Occupational Choice of Immigrants," Working Papers ClioLab 14, EH Clio Lab. Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.
    3. Marcus H. Böhme & Sarah Kups, 2017. "The economic effects of labour immigration in developing countries: A literature review," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 335, OECD Publishing.
    4. Eric Strobl & Marie-Anne Valfort, 2015. "The Effect of Weather-Induced Internal Migration on Local Labor Markets. Evidence from Uganda," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 29(2), pages 385-412.
    5. Julie L. Hotchkiss & Myriam Quispe-Agnoli, 2008. "The labor market experience and impact of undocumented workers," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2008-07, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    6. Yigit Aydede, 2014. "Spatial regularities between non-immigrant and immigrant numbers in Canada," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 11(1), pages 90-100, January.
    7. Labanca, Claudio, 2016. "The Effects of a Temporary Migration Shock: Evidence from the Arab Spring Migration through Italy," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt1fz17847, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
    8. repec:ipg:wpaper:2014-460 is not listed on IDEAS

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