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Spatial regularities between non-immigrant and immigrant numbers in Canada

Author

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  • Yigit Aydede

    () (Department of Economics, Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, B3H3C3, Canada.)

Abstract

The present study intends to reveal spatial regularities between non-immigrant and immigrant numbers in two different ways. First, it questions the existence of those regularities when spatial scales get finer. Second, it uses pooled data over four population censuses covering the period from 1991 to 2006, which enabled us to apply appropriate techniques to remove those unobserved fixed effects so that the estimations would accurately identify the linkage between local immigrant and non-immigrant numbers. The results provide evidence about the existence of negative spatial regularities between non-immigrant and immigrant numbers in Canada at national scale.

Suggested Citation

  • Yigit Aydede, 2014. "Spatial regularities between non-immigrant and immigrant numbers in Canada," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 11(1), pages 90-100, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:mig:journl:v:11:y:2014:i:1:p:90-100
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John DiNardo & David Card, 2000. "Do Immigrant Inflows Lead to Native Outflows?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 360-367, May.
    2. Saiz, Albert, 2007. "Immigration and housing rents in American cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 345-371, March.
    3. James M. Poterba, 1991. "House Price Dynamics: The Role of Tax Policy," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 22(2), pages 143-204.
    4. George J. Borjas, 2006. "Native Internal Migration and the Labor Market Impact of Immigration," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(2).
    5. Card, David, 2001. "Immigrant Inflows, Native Outflows, and the Local Labor Market Impacts of Higher Immigration," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(1), pages 22-64, January.
    6. Maya N. Federman & David E. Harrington & Kathy J. Krynski, 2006. "Vietnamese Manicurists: Are Immigrants Displacing Natives or Finding New Nails to Polish?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 59(2), pages 302-318, January.
    7. Krishna Pendakur & Ravi Pendakur, 1998. "The Colour of Money: Earnings Differentials Among Ethnic Groups in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(3), pages 518-548, August.
    8. Glaeser, Edward L., 2008. "Cities, Agglomeration, and Spatial Equilibrium," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199290444.
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