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Immigration, Trade, and the Labor Market

Editor

Listed:
  • Abowd, John M.
  • Freeman, Richard B.

Abstract

Are immigrants squeezing Americans out of the work force? Or is competition wth foreign products imported by the United States an even greater danger to those employed in some industries? How do wages and unions fare in foreign-owned firms? And are the media's claims about the number of illegal immigrants misleading? Prompted by the growing internationalization of the U.S. labor market since the 1970s, contributors to Immigration, Trade, and the Labor Market provide an innovative and comprehensive analysis of the labor market impact of the international movements of people, goods, and capital. Their provocative findings are brought into perspective by studies of two other major immigrant-recipient countries, Canada and Australia. The differing experiences of each nation stress the degree to which labor market institutions and economic policies can condition the effect of immigration and trade on economic outcomes Contributors trace the flow of immigrants by comparing the labor market and migration behavior of individual immigrants, explore the effects of immigration on wages and employment by comparing the composition of the work force in local labor markets, and analyze the impact of trade on labor markets in different industries. A unique data set was developed especially for this study—ranging from an effort to link exports/imports with wages and employment in manufacturing industries, to a survey of illegal Mexican immigrants in the San Diego area—which will prove enormously valuable for future research.

Suggested Citation

  • Abowd, John M. & Freeman, Richard B. (ed.), 1991. "Immigration, Trade, and the Labor Market," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, number 9780226000954, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:bknber:9780226000954
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Kuhn, "undated". "Canada and the "OECD Hypothesis": Does Labour Market Inflexibility Explain Canada's High Level of Unemployment?," Canadian International Labour Network Working Papers 10, McMaster University.
    2. Dube Arindrajit & Reddy Sanjay G., 2014. "Threat Effects and Trade: Wage Discipline through Product Market Competition," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 4(2), pages 213-252, March.
    3. Jozef Konings & Alan Murphy, 2001. "Do Multinational Enterprises Substitute Parent Jobs for Foreign Ones? Evidence from Firm Level Panel Data," LICOS Discussion Papers 10001, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    4. repec:wfo:wstudy:19839 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Jorge Saba Arbache, 2001. "Trade Liberalisation and Labor Markets in Developing Countries: Theory and Evidence," Studies in Economics 0112, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    6. Steven J. Davis & Magnus Henrekson, 1997. "Industrial Policy, Employer Size, and Economic Performance in Sweden," NBER Chapters,in: The Welfare State in Transition: Reforming the Swedish Model, pages 353-398 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Francine D. Blau, 1992. "The Fertility of Immigrant Women: Evidence from High-Fertility Source Countries," NBER Chapters,in: Immigration and the Workforce: Economic Consequences for the United States and Source Areas, pages 93-134 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Manuela Angelucci, 2012. "US Border Enforcement and the Net Flow of Mexican Illegal Migration," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 60(2), pages 311-357.
    9. Jill Rubery & Annamaria Simonazzi & Kevin Ward, 2010. "Exploring international migration and outsourcing through an institutional lens," BIS Papers chapters,in: Globalisation, labour markets and international adjustment - Essays in honour of Palle S Andersen, volume 50, pages 77-103 Bank for International Settlements.
    10. Julian R. Betts & Magnus Lofstrom, 2000. "The Educational Attainment of Immigrants: Trends and Implications," NBER Chapters,in: Issues in the Economics of Immigration, pages 51-116 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Jackline Wahba & Nelly El-Mallakh, 2017. "Return Migrants and the Wage Premium: Does the Legal Status of Migrants Matter?," Working Papers 1133, Economic Research Forum, revised 08 2017.
    12. George J. Borjas & Richard B. Freeman & Lawrence F. Katz, 1992. "On the Labor Market Effects of Immigration and Trade," NBER Chapters,in: Immigration and the Workforce: Economic Consequences for the United States and Source Areas, pages 213-244 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. David Card & Richard B. Freeman, 1993. "Introduction to "Small Differences That Matter: Labor Markets and Income Maintenance in Canada and the United States"," NBER Chapters,in: Small Differences That Matter: Labor Markets and Income Maintenance in Canada and the United States, pages 1-20 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Richard B. Freeman & Lawrence F. Katz, 1995. "Introduction and Summary," NBER Chapters,in: Differences and Changes in Wage Structures, pages 1-22 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
      • John M. Abowd & Richard B. Freeman, 1991. "Introduction and Summary," NBER Chapters,in: Immigration, Trade, and the Labor Market, pages 1-26 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
      • George J. Borjas & Richard B. Freeman, 1992. "Introduction and Summary," NBER Chapters,in: Immigration and the Workforce: Economic Consequences for the United States and Source Areas, pages 1-16 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Richard H. Clarida & Susan Hickok, 1993. "US Manufacturing and the Deindustrialisation Debate," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(2), pages 173-192, March.
    16. Maude Toussaint-Comeau, 2016. "Mexican immigration, occupational clustering, and the local labor market adjustment of African-American workers," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-31, December.
    17. repec:bin:bpeajo:v:24:y:1993:i:1993-2m:p:161-226 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Peter Huber & Yvonne Wolfmayr-Schnitzer, 2000. "Foreign Trade and Wages," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 73(3), pages 197-210, March.
    19. Jennifer Hook & Frank Bean & James Bachmeier & Catherine Tucker, 2014. "Recent Trends in Coverage of the Mexican-Born Population of the United States: Results From Applying Multiple Methods Across Time," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(2), pages 699-726, April.
    20. Larch, Mario & Lechthaler, Wolfgang, 2008. "Multinational firms and heterogeneous labor," Kiel Working Papers 1454, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    21. Randall Filer, 1992. "The Effect of Immigrant Arrivals on Migratory Patterns of Native Workers," NBER Chapters,in: Immigration and the Workforce: Economic Consequences for the United States and Source Areas, pages 245-270 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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