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The Effect of Wages on the Retention of Nurses

Author

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  • Dennis A. Ahlburg
  • Christine Brown Mahoney

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Dennis A. Ahlburg & Christine Brown Mahoney, 1996. "The Effect of Wages on the Retention of Nurses," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 29(s1), pages 126-129, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:29:y:1996:i:s1:p:126-29
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    Cited by:

    1. Cottini, Elena & Kato, Takao & Westergaard-Nielsen, Niels, 2011. "Adverse workplace conditions, high-involvement work practices and labor turnover: Evidence from Danish linked employer–employee data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 872-880.
    2. Pudney, Stephen & Shields, Michael A, 2000. " Gender and Racial Discrimination in Pay and Promotion for NHS Nurses," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 62(0), pages 801-835, Special I.
    3. Shields, Michael A & Price, Stephen Wheatley, 2002. "Racial Harassment, Job Satisfaction and Intentions to Quit: Evidence from the British Nursing Profession," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 69(274), pages 295-226, May.
    4. Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields & Stephen Wheatley Price, 2007. "Investigating the quitting decision of nurses: panel data evidence from the british national health service," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 57-73.
    5. Tor Helge Holmås, 2002. "Keeping nurses at work: a duration analysis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(6), pages 493-503.
    6. Reagan Baughman & Kristin Smith, 2007. "The labor market for direct care workers," New England Public Policy Center Working Paper 07-4, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    7. Denise Doiron & Glenn Jones, 2005. "Trends in the nursing workforce in New South Wales, CHERE Research Report 23," Research Reports 23, CHERE, University of Technology, Sydney.
    8. Michelle Cunich & Stephen Whelan, 2010. "Nurse Education and the Retention of Registered Nurses in New South Wales," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(274), pages 396-413, September.

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