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Nurse Education and the Retention of Registered Nurses in New South Wales

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  • MICHELLE CUNICH
  • STEPHEN WHELAN

Abstract

The retention of registered nurses (RNs) in the nursing profession has become a key issue for governments. This article examines the impact of a change in the nature of nurse education, from hospital-based to university-based training, on the labour market behaviour of RNs. The analysis indicates that RNs trained in universities are approximately 6 per cent more likely to exit the nursing workforce than hospital-trained RNs. The analysis highlights the need to develop policies to address the low retention rates for nurses in the health system such as developing clearer career paths and enhancing the non-pecuniary aspects of nursing. Copyright © 2010 The Economic Society of Australia.

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  • Michelle Cunich & Stephen Whelan, 2010. "Nurse Education and the Retention of Registered Nurses in New South Wales," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(274), pages 396-413, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:86:y:2010:i:274:p:396-413
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Elliott, Robert F. & Ma, Ada H.Y. & Scott, Anthony & Bell, David & Roberts, Elizabeth, 2007. "Geographically differentiated pay in the labour market for nurses," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 190-212, January.
    2. Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields & Stephen Wheatley Price, 2007. "Investigating the quitting decision of nurses: panel data evidence from the british national health service," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 57-73.
    3. Shields, Michael A. & Ward, Melanie, 2001. "Improving nurse retention in the National Health Service in England: the impact of job satisfaction on intentions to quit," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 677-701, September.
    4. Phillips, V. L., 1995. "Nurses' labor supply: Participation, hours of work, and discontinuities in the supply function," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 567-582, December.
    5. Denise Doiron & Glenn Jones, 2006. "Nurses' Retention and Hospital Characteristics in New South Wales," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 82(256), pages 11-29, March.
    6. Dennis A. Ahlburg & Christine Brown Mahoney, 1996. "The Effect of Wages on the Retention of Nurses," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 29(s1), pages 126-129, April.
    7. Michael A. Shields, 2004. "Addressing nurse shortages: what can policy makers learn from the econometric evidence on nurse labour supply?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(499), pages 464-498, November.
    8. Chandra Shah & Michael Long, 2003. "Employment changes and job openings for new entrants in nursing and caring occupations in Australia," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 6(3), pages 453-472, September.
    9. Denise Doiron & Glenn Jones, 2005. "Trends in the nursing workforce in New South Wales, CHERE Research Report 23," Research Reports 23, CHERE, University of Technology, Sydney.
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