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Nurses' labor supply: Participation, hours of work, and discontinuities in the supply function

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  • Phillips, V. L.

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  • Phillips, V. L., 1995. "Nurses' labor supply: Participation, hours of work, and discontinuities in the supply function," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 567-582, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:14:y:1995:i:5:p:567-582
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jerry A. Hausman, 1980. "The effect of wages, taxes, and fixed costs on women's labor force participation," NBER Chapters,in: Econometric Studies in Public Finance, pages 161-194 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Frank A. Sloan & Somchai Richupan, 1975. "Short-Run Supply Responses of Professional Nurses: A Microanalysis," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 10(2), pages 241-257.
    3. Blank, Rebecca M, 1988. "Simultaneously Modeling the Supply of Weeks and Hours of Work among Female Household Heads," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(2), pages 177-204, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gray, Alastair M. & Phillips, V. L. & Normand, Charles, 1996. "The costs of nursing turnover: evidence from the British National Health Service," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 117-128, November.
    2. Di Tommaso, M.L. & Strøm, S. & Sæther, E.M., 2009. "Nurses wanted: Is the job too harsh or is the wage too low?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 748-757, May.
    3. Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields & Stephen Wheatley Price, 2007. "Investigating the quitting decision of nurses: panel data evidence from the british national health service," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 57-73.
    4. Hanel, Barbara & Kalb, Guyonne & Scott, Anthony, 2014. "Nurses’ labour supply elasticities: The importance of accounting for extensive margins," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 94-112.
    5. Sæther, Erik Magnus, 2009. "Will increased wages increase nurses' working hours in the health care sector?," HERO On line Working Paper Series 2004:7, Oslo University, Health Economics Research Programme.
    6. Jan Erik Askildsen & Badi H. Baltagi & Tor Helge Holmås, 2002. "Will Increased Wages Reduce Shortage of Nurses? A Panel Data Analysis of Nurses’ Labour Supply," CESifo Working Paper Series 794, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Chiha, Yvana A. & Link, Charles R., 2003. "The shortage of registered nurses and some new estimates of the effects of wages on registered nurses labor supply: a look at the past and a preview of the 21st century," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 349-375, June.
    8. Michael A. Shields & Melanie E. Ward, "undated". "Improving Nurse Retention in the British National Health Service: The Impact of Job Satisfaction on Intentions to Quit," Discussion Papers in Public Sector Economics 00/3, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    9. Sæther, Erik Magnus, 2009. "Nurses’ labor supply with endogenous choice of care level and shift type A nested discrete choice model with nonlinear income," HERO On line Working Paper Series 2004:9, Oslo University, Health Economics Research Programme.
    10. Shields, Michael A. & Ward, Melanie, 2001. "Improving nurse retention in the National Health Service in England: the impact of job satisfaction on intentions to quit," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 677-701, September.
    11. Edward J. Schumacher, "undated". "Relative Wages and Exit Behavior Among Registered Nurses," Working Papers 9602, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.
    12. Edward J. Schumacher, "undated". "Relative Wages and the Returns to Education in the Labor Market for Registered Nurses," Working Papers 9601, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.
    13. Edward J. Schumacher, "undated". "Relative Wages and the Returns to Education in the Labor Market for Registered Nurses," Working Papers 9720, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.
    14. Barbara Eberth & Robert F. Elliott & Diane Skåtun, 2016. "Pay or conditions? The role of workplace characteristics in nurses’ labor supply," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(6), pages 771-785, July.
    15. Michelle Cunich & Stephen Whelan, 2010. "Nurse Education and the Retention of Registered Nurses in New South Wales," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(274), pages 396-413, September.
    16. Rowena Crawford & Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson, 2015. "The short run elasticity of National Health Service nurses’ labour supply in Great Britain," IFS Working Papers W15/04, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    17. Qin, Xuezheng & Li, Lixing & Hsieh, Chee-Ruey, 2013. "Too few doctors or too low wages? Labor supply of health care professionals in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 150-164.
    18. Stephen Pudney & Michael Shields, 2000. "Gender, race, pay and promotion in the British nursing profession: estimation of a generalized ordered probit model," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(4), pages 367-399.

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