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The labour market for nursing: a review of the labour supply literature

Author

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  • Emanuela Antonazzo

    (Health Economics Research Unit, Aberdeen, UK)

  • Anthony Scott
  • Diane Skatun
  • Robert. F. Elliott

Abstract

The need to ensure adequate numbers of motivated health professionals is at the forefront of the modernisation of the UK NHS. The aim of this paper is to assess current understanding of the labour supply behaviour of nurses, and to propose an agenda for further research. In particular, the paper reviews American and British economics literature that focuses on empirical econometric studies based on the classical static labour supply model. American research could be classified into first generation, second generation and recent empirical evidence. Advances in methods mirror those in the general labour economics literature, and include the use of limited dependent variable models and the treatment of sample selection issues. However, there is considerable variation in results, which depends on the methods used, particularly on the effect of wages. Only one study was found that used UK data, although other studies examined the determinants of turnover, quit rates and job satisfaction. The agenda for further empirical research includes the analysis of discontinuities in the labour supply function, the relative importance of pecuniary and non-pecuniary job characteristics, and the application of dynamic and family labour supply models to nursing research. Such research is crucial to the development of evidence-based policies. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Emanuela Antonazzo & Anthony Scott & Diane Skatun & Robert. F. Elliott, 2003. "The labour market for nursing: a review of the labour supply literature," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(6), pages 465-478.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:12:y:2003:i:6:p:465-478
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.737
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Blanchflower, David G & Oswald, Andrew J, 1998. "What Makes an Entrepreneur?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(1), pages 26-60, January.
    2. Gray, Alastair M. & Phillips, V. L. & Normand, Charles, 1996. "The costs of nursing turnover: evidence from the British National Health Service," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 117-128, November.
    3. Blundell, Richard & Macurdy, Thomas, 1999. "Labor supply: A review of alternative approaches," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 27, pages 1559-1695 Elsevier.
    4. Clark, Andrew E. & Oswald, Andrew J., 1996. "Satisfaction and comparison income," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 359-381, September.
    5. Link, Charles R. & Settle, Russell F., 1985. "Labor supply responses of licensed practical nurses: A partial solution to a nurse shortage?," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 49-57, February.
    6. Michael A. Shields & Melanie E. Ward, "undated". "Improving Nurse Retention in the British National Health Service: The Impact of Job Satisfaction on Intentions to Quit," Discussion Papers in Public Sector Economics 00/3, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    7. M. F. Bognanno & J. S. Hixson & J. R. Jeffers, 1974. "The Short-Run Supply of Nurse's Time," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 9(1), pages 80-94.
    8. Freeman, Richard B, 1978. "Job Satisfaction as an Economic Variable," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(2), pages 135-141, May.
    9. Alastair Gray & Charles Normand & Elizabeth Currie, 1988. "Staff turnover in the NHS: a preliminary economic analysis," Working Papers 046chedp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    10. Gray, Alastair M. & Phillips, V. L., 1996. "Labour turnover in the British National Health Service: a local labour market analysis," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 273-289, June.
    11. Blank, Rebecca M, 1988. "Simultaneously Modeling the Supply of Weeks and Hours of Work among Female Household Heads," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(2), pages 177-204, April.
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