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Adverse workplace conditions, high-involvement work practices and labor turnover: Evidence from Danish linked employer–employee data

  • Cottini, Elena
  • Kato, Takao
  • Westergaard-Nielsen, Niels

Using Danish linked employer–employee data, we find that: (i) exposing the worker to physical hazards leads to a 3 percentage point increase in the probability of voluntary turnover from the average rate of 18%; (ii) working in night shift results in an 11-percentage point hike; and (iii) having an unsupportive boss leads to a 6-percentage point jump. High involvement work practices are found to play a significant role in mitigating the adverse effects of workplace hazards. Finally, the worker under adverse workplace conditions is found to improve the 5-year odds of rectifying such workplace adversities by quitting the firm.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Labour Economics.

Volume (Year): 18 (2011)
Issue (Month): 6 ()
Pages: 872-880

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Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:18:y:2011:i:6:p:872-880
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/labeco

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