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Human Resource Management Policies and Productivity: New Evidence from An Econometric Case Study

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  • Derek C. Jones
  • Panu Kalmi
  • Antti Kauhanen

Abstract

First we distinguish various approaches used by economists to assess the impact of human resource management practices on productivity and then we briefly review and illustrate studies that represent different approaches. In the main part of the paper we illustrate the econometric case study method, by using new data to analyse a case from retail trade and by emulating an approach used in an earlier study. Consistent with theory we find that when employees have opportunities to participate, and to receive appropriate information and pertinent rewards, a one standard deviation increase of the first principal component score would increase productivity by 1 per cent. Our findings imply that there are benefits to innovative work practices, even in settings where employees do simple tasks and employees are relatively low-skilled. Since our findings are similar to those contained in a previous study, our results also indicate the value of replication studies. Copyright 2006, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Derek C. Jones & Panu Kalmi & Antti Kauhanen, 2006. "Human Resource Management Policies and Productivity: New Evidence from An Econometric Case Study," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(4), pages 526-538, Winter.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:22:y:2006:i:4:p:526-538
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    Cited by:

    1. Derek C. Jones & Panu Kalmi & Antti Kauhanen, 2012. "The effects of general and firm-specific training on wages and performance: evidence from banking," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(1), pages 151-175, January.
    2. Derek C. Jones & Takao Kato, 2011. "The Impact of Teams on Output, Quality, and Downtime: An Empirical Analysis Using Individual Panel Data," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 64(2), pages 215-240, January.
    3. Kato, Takao & Lee, Ju Ho & Ryu, Jang-Soo, 2010. "The Productivity Effects of Profit Sharing, Employee Ownership, Stock Option and Team Incentive Plans: Evidence from Korean Panel Data," IZA Discussion Papers 5111, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Cottini, Elena & Kato, Takao & Westergaard-Nielsen, Niels, 2011. "Adverse workplace conditions, high-involvement work practices and labor turnover: Evidence from Danish linked employer–employee data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 872-880.
    5. Sáenz-Royo, Carlos & Salas-Fumás, Vicente, 2014. "Long- and short-term efficiency in an automobile factory: An econometric case study," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 98-107.
    6. Fernández, Rosa M. & Nordman, Christophe J., 2009. "Are there pecuniary compensations for working conditions?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 194-207, April.
    7. Artz, Georgeanne M. & Kim, Younjun, 2011. "Business Ownership by Workers: Are Worker Cooperatives a Viable Option?," Staff General Research Papers Archive 34575, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    8. Dong, Xiao-Yuan & Jones, Derek C. & Kato, Takao, 2007. "Earnings-Tenure Profiles: Tests of Agency and Human Capital Theories Using Individual Performance Data," IZA Discussion Papers 3122, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Kauhanen, Antti & Roponen, Satu, 2010. "Productivity dispersion: A case study," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 97-100, June.
    10. Nicolas Aubert & Xavier Hollandts, 2015. "How Shared Capitalism Affects Employee Withdrawal: An Econometric Case Study Of A French-Listed Company," Post-Print halshs-01256759, HAL.

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