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Productivity dispersion: A case study


  • Kauhanen, Antti
  • Roponen, Satu


This paper studies productivity dispersion in a retail chain. We find that productivity is highly dispersed between the branches. Furthermore, productivity rankings are quite persistent. Accounting for employee skills and human resource management decreases the productivity dispersion only slightly. The results suggest that productivity dispersion is "real".

Suggested Citation

  • Kauhanen, Antti & Roponen, Satu, 2010. "Productivity dispersion: A case study," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 97-100, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:reecon:v:64:y:2010:i:2:p:97-100

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mark Doms & Eric J. Bartelsman, 2000. "Understanding Productivity: Lessons from Longitudinal Microdata," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(3), pages 569-594, September.
    2. Oulton, Nicholas, 1998. "Competition and the Dispersion of Labour Productivity amongst UK Companies," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 50(1), pages 23-38, January.
    3. Casey Ichniowski & Kathryn Shaw, 2003. "Beyond Incentive Pay: Insiders' Estimates of the Value of Complementary Human Resource Management Practices," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(1), pages 155-180, Winter.
    4. Timothy Dunne & Lucia Foster & John Haltiwanger & Kenneth R. Troske, 2004. "Wage and Productivity Dispersion in United States Manufacturing: The Role of Computer Investment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(2), pages 397-430, April.
    5. Chad Syverson, 2004. "Product Substitutability and Productivity Dispersion," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(2), pages 534-550, May.
    6. Derek C. Jones & Panu Kalmi & Antti Kauhanen, 2006. "Human Resource Management Policies and Productivity: New Evidence from An Econometric Case Study," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(4), pages 526-538, Winter.
    7. Rachel Griffith & Jonathan Haskel & Andy Neely, 2006. "Why is Productivity so Dispersed?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(4), pages 513-525, Winter.
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