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High Performance Work Practices and Employee Voice: A Comparison of Japanese and Korean Workers

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  • KIU-SIK BAE
  • HIROYUKI CHUMA
  • TAKAO KATO
  • DONG-BAE KIM
  • ISAO OHASHI

Abstract

Using a unique new cross-national survey of Japanese and Korean workers, we report the first systematic evidence on the effects on employee voice of High Performance Work Practices (HPWPs) from the two economies which are noted for the wide use of HPWPs. We find for both nations that: (i) workers in firms with HPWPs aimed at creating opportunities for employees to get involved (such as shopfloor committees and small group activities) are indeed more likely to have stronger senses of influence and voice on shopfloor decision making than other workers; (ii) workers whose pay is tied to firm performance are more likely to have a stake in firm performance and hence demand such influence and voice; and (iii) consequently workers in firms with HPWPs are more likely to make frequent suggestions for productivity increase and quality improvement. As such, this paper contributes to a small yet growing new empirical literature which tries to understand the actual process and mechanism through which HPWPs lead to better enterprise performance.
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Suggested Citation

  • Kiu-Sik Bae & Hiroyuki Chuma & Takao Kato & Dong-Bae Kim & Isao Ohashi, 2011. "High Performance Work Practices and Employee Voice: A Comparison of Japanese and Korean Workers," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 1-29, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:indres:v:50:y:2011:i:1:p:1-29
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1468-232X.2010.00623.x
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    Cited by:

    1. Jaren Haber, 2016. "Institutionalized Involvement: Teams and Stress in 1990s U.S. Steel," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(4), pages 632-661, October.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J53 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Labor-Management Relations; Industrial Jurisprudence
    • M54 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Labor Management
    • M52 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Compensation and Compensation Methods and Their Effects

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