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Gender, Race, Pay and Promotion in the British Nursing Profession: Estimation of a Generalised Ordered Probit Model

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  • Stephen Pudney
  • Michael Shields

Abstract

We analyse job grading within the UK National Health Service nursing profession, using 1994 survey data. We start from the ordered probit model, for which we develop and apply appropriate specification tests. Threshold constancy and covariate exogeneity are rejected, with important consequences for estimates of the influence of gender, ethnicity, training and career interruptions. We find little evidence of disadvantage for females relative to males, but significant differences in speed of promotion between ethnic groups, implying non-negligible differences in lifetime earnings. Copyright © 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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  • Stephen Pudney & Michael Shields, "undated". "Gender, Race, Pay and Promotion in the British Nursing Profession: Estimation of a Generalised Ordered Probit Model," Discussion Papers in Public Sector Economics 97/4, Division of Economics, School of Business, University of Leicester.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:lpserc:97/4
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