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Will Changing Times Change the Allocation of Faculty Time?

Author

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  • Larry D. Singell
  • Jane H. Lillydahl

Abstract

This paper examines faculty time allocation decisions that are fundamental to the functioning of a university. A random-utility approach yields a grouped-data, multinomial logit model and predicts that time allocation decisions depend systematically on both personal and institutional attributes. The empirical results for a random sample of U.S. arts and sciences faculty indicate that structural differences between universities with different research orientations account for most of the significant differences in faculty time allocations. Faculty characteristics reinforce institutional missions, however, and thus condition university policies for change (for example, attempts to mandate greater time to teaching in research universities).

Suggested Citation

  • Larry D. Singell & Jane H. Lillydahl, 1996. "Will Changing Times Change the Allocation of Faculty Time?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(2), pages 429-449.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:31:y:1996:i:2:p:429-449
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Catherine P. Slade & Saundra J. Ribando & C. Kevin Fortner, 2016. "Faculty research following merger: a job stress and social identity theory perspective," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 107(1), pages 71-89, April.
    2. Colleen Manchester & Debra Barbezat, 2013. "The Effect of Time Use in Explaining Male–Female Productivity Differences Among Economists," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(1), pages 53-77, January.
    3. Link, Albert N. & Swann, Christopher A. & Bozeman, Barry, 2008. "A time allocation study of university faculty," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 363-374, August.
    4. James A. Cunningham & Paul O’Reilly & Brendan Dolan & Conor O’Kane & Vincent Mangematin, 2016. "Publicly funded principal investigators allocation of time for public sector entrepreneurship activities," Economia e Politica Industriale: Journal of Industrial and Business Economics, Springer;Associazione Amici di Economia e Politica Industriale, vol. 43(4), pages 383-408, December.
    5. Michael Jones, 2015. "How do teachers respond to tenure?," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-19, December.
    6. Derrick M. Anderson & Catherine P. Slade, 2016. "Managing Institutional Research Advancement: Implications from a University Faculty Time Allocation Study," Research in Higher Education, Springer;Association for Institutional Research, vol. 57(1), pages 99-121, February.
    7. Porter, Stephen R. & Toutkoushian, Robert K., 2006. "Institutional research productivity and the connection to average student quality and overall reputation," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 605-617, December.
    8. repec:spr:reihed:v:58:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s11162-017-9454-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Toutkoushian, Robert K., 1999. "The status of academic women in the 1990s No longer outsiders, but not yet equals," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 679-698.
    10. Cassandra M. Guarino & Victor M. H. Borden, 2017. "Faculty Service Loads and Gender: Are Women Taking Care of the Academic Family?," Research in Higher Education, Springer;Association for Institutional Research, vol. 58(6), pages 672-694, September.

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