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A time allocation study of university faculty

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  • Link, Albert N.
  • Swann, Christopher A.
  • Bozeman, Barry

Abstract

Many previous time allocation studies treat work as a single activity and examine trade-offs between work and other activities. This paper investigates the at-work allocation of time among teaching, research, grant writing and service by science and engineering faculty at top US research universities. We focus on the relationship between tenure (and promotion) and time allocation, and we find that tenure and promotion do affect the allocation of time. The specific trade-offs are related to particular career paths. For example, full professors spend increasing time on service at the expense of teaching and research while longer-term associate professors who have not been promoted to full professor spend significantly more time teaching at the expense of research time. Finally, our results suggest that women, on average, allocate more hours to university service and less time to research than do men.

Suggested Citation

  • Link, Albert N. & Swann, Christopher A. & Bozeman, Barry, 2008. "A time allocation study of university faculty," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 363-374, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:27:y:2008:i:4:p:363-374
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chen, Zhiqi & Ferris, J Stephen, 1999. "A Theory of Tenure for the Teaching University," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(1), pages 9-25, March.
    2. Larry D. Singell & Jane H. Lillydahl, 1996. "Will Changing Times Change the Allocation of Faculty Time?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(2), pages 429-449.
    3. Marie C. Thursby & Jerry Thursby & Swasti Gupta-Mukherjee, 2007. "Are There Real Effects of Licensing on Academic Research? A Life Cycle View," NBER Chapters,in: Academic Science and Entrepreneurship: Dual Engines of Growth National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Ambrose Leung, 2004. "Delinquency, schooling, and work: time allocation decision of youth," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(9), pages 987-993.
    5. Killingsworth, Mark R. & Heckman, James J., 1987. "Female labor supply: A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 103-204 Elsevier.
    6. Papke, Leslie E & Wooldridge, Jeffrey M, 1996. "Econometric Methods for Fractional Response Variables with an Application to 401(K) Plan Participation Rates," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(6), pages 619-632, Nov.-Dec..
    7. Brent Goldfarb & Gerald Marschke & Amy Smith, 2009. "Scholarship and inventive activity in the university: complements or substitutes?," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(8), pages 743-756.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. What faculty spend their time on
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2008-10-08 13:54:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Catherine P. Slade & Saundra J. Ribando & C. Kevin Fortner, 2016. "Faculty research following merger: a job stress and social identity theory perspective," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 107(1), pages 71-89, April.
    2. repec:kap:sbusec:v:48:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11187-016-9795-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Guo, Qian & Song, Yang & Sun, Wenkai & Wang, Yijie, 2016. "Gender differences in performance-based pay: Evidence from a Chinese University," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 104-113.
    4. Daiji Kawaguchi & Ayako Kondo & Keiji Saito, 2016. "Researchers’ career transitions over the life cycle," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 109(3), pages 1435-1454, December.
    5. James A. Cunningham & Paul O’Reilly & Brendan Dolan & Conor O’Kane & Vincent Mangematin, 2016. "Publicly funded principal investigators allocation of time for public sector entrepreneurship activities," Economia e Politica Industriale: Journal of Industrial and Business Economics, Springer;Associazione Amici di Economia e Politica Industriale, vol. 43(4), pages 383-408, December.
    6. Michael Jones, 2015. "How do teachers respond to tenure?," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-19, December.
    7. repec:spr:jlabre:v:38:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s12122-017-9254-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Derrick M. Anderson & Catherine P. Slade, 2016. "Managing Institutional Research Advancement: Implications from a University Faculty Time Allocation Study," Research in Higher Education, Springer;Association for Institutional Research, vol. 57(1), pages 99-121, February.
    9. repec:spr:scient:v:86:y:2011:i:2:d:10.1007_s11192-010-0278-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Tuomas Höylä & Christoph Bartneck & Timo Tiihonen, 2016. "The consequences of competition: simulating the effects of research grant allocation strategies," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 108(1), pages 263-288, July.
    11. Manuel Crespo & Denis Bertrand, 2013. "Faculty Workload in a Research Intensive University: A Case Study," CIRANO Project Reports 2013rp-11, CIRANO.
    12. Mengel, Friederike & Sauermann, Jan & Zölitz, Ulf, 2017. "Gender Bias in Teaching Evaluations," IZA Discussion Papers 11000, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Cynthia L. Harter & William E. Becker & Michael Watts, 2011. "Time Allocations and Reward Structures for US Academic Economists from 1955–2005: Evidence from Three National Surveys," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 10(2), pages 6-27.
    14. Bozeman, Barry & Gaughan, Monica, 2011. "How do men and women differ in research collaborations? An analysis of the collaborative motives and strategies of academic researchers," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(10), pages 1393-1402.
    15. Anne Boring, 2015. "Gender Biases in student evaluations of teachers," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2015-13, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).

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