IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/koe/wpaper/1429.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Gender Promotion Differences in Economics Departments in Japan: A Duration Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Ana Maria Takahashi

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University)

  • Shingo Takahashi

    () (International University of Japan, Graduate School of International Management)

Abstract

Using a unique data set from our survey of academic economists in Japan, we present the first detailed study of gender promotion gaps in Japanese academia. The length of time from initial appointment to promotion to associate professor is greater for women than men, largely due to women spending more time as lecturer, the lowest academic rank. The gender gaps in promotions from associate professor to full professor are more complex. Childless women are promoted \emph{faster} than childless men. However, since the burden of parenting disproportionately falls on women, this `reverse' gender gap disappears after a first child is born, and women's time to promotion becomes significantly longer than men's if they have a second child.

Suggested Citation

  • Ana Maria Takahashi & Shingo Takahashi, 2014. "Gender Promotion Differences in Economics Departments in Japan: A Duration Analysis," Discussion Papers 1429, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
  • Handle: RePEc:koe:wpaper:1429
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.econ.kobe-u.ac.jp/RePEc/koe/wpaper/2014/1429.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Takahashi, Ana Maria & Takahashi, Shingo, 2011. "Gender salary differences in economics departments in Japan," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1306-1319.
    2. Ana Maria Takahashi & Shingo Takahashi & Thomas Maloney, 2015. "Gender salary and promotion gaps in Japanese academia: Results from science and engineering," Working Papers EMS_2015_02, Research Institute, International University of Japan.
    3. repec:eee:jeborg:v:140:y:2017:i:c:p:147-175 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Krapf, Matthias & Ursprung, Heinrich W. & Zimmermann, Christian, 2017. "Parenthood and productivity of highly skilled labor: Evidence from the groves of academe," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 140(C), pages 147-175.
    5. Ward, Melanie E, 2001. "Gender and Promotion in the Academic Profession," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 48(3), pages 283-302, August.
    6. David Blackaby & Alison L Booth & Jeff Frank, 2005. "Outside Offers And The Gender Pay Gap: Empirical Evidence From the UK Academic Labour Market," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(501), pages 81-107, February.
    7. Donna K. Ginther & Kathy J. Hayes, 2003. "Gender Differences in Salary and Promotion for Faculty in the Humanities 1977–95," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(1).
    8. Broder, Ivy E, 1993. "Professional Achievements and Gender Differences among Academic Economists," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 31(1), pages 116-127, January.
    9. William J. Moore & Robert J. Newman & Dek Terrell, 2007. "Academic Pay in the United Kingdom and the United States: The Differential Returns to Productivity and the Lifetime Earnings Gap," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 73(3), pages 717-732, January.
    10. David Blackaby & Alison L Booth & Jeff Frank, 2005. "Outside Offers And The Gender Pay Gap: Empirical Evidence From the UK Academic Labour Market," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(501), pages 81-107, February.
    11. Kahn, Shulamit, 1993. "Gender Differences in Academic Career Paths of Economists," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 52-56, May.
    12. Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf & Zweimuller, Josef, 1997. "Unequal Assignment and Unequal Promotion in Job Ladders," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(1), pages 43-71, January.
    13. John M. McDowell & Larry D. Singell Jr. & James P. Ziliak, 2001. "Gender and Promotion in the Economics Profession," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 54(2), pages 224-244, January.
    14. Donna K. Ginther & Shulamit Kahn, 2004. "Women in Economics: Moving Up or Falling Off the Academic Career Ladder?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(3), pages 193-214, Summer.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ana Maria Takahashi & Shingo Takahashi & Thomas Maloney, 2015. "Gender salary and promotion gaps in Japanese academia: Results from science and engineering," Discussion Papers 1522, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
    2. Cornelia Lawson & Sotaro Shibayama, 2015. "International research visits and careers: An analysis of bioscience academics in Japan," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 42(5), pages 690-710.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:koe:wpaper:1429. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Kimiaki Shirahama) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Kimiaki Shirahama to update the entry or send us the correct email address. General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/fekobjp.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.