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Gender and Promotion in the Academic Profession

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  • Ward, Melanie E

Abstract

This paper examines the possibility that the gender rank distribution observed in the academic labour market is predominantly explained by two factors. First, the differing average characteristics of male and female academics, and second, barriers to female promotion. Despite detailed controls for personal attributes, including career breaks and publication history, male academics are more likely to be found in higher grades. Promotion from researcher to lecturer is a relatively high hurdle for women. Evidence suggests that initial placement and the process of moving between universities contributes to the male advantage in rank attainment. Copyright 2001 by Scottish Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Ward, Melanie E, 2001. "Gender and Promotion in the Academic Profession," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 48(3), pages 283-302, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:48:y:2001:i:3:p:283-302
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    Cited by:

    1. Ana Maria Takahashi & Shingo Takahashi & Thomas Maloney, 2015. "Gender salary and promotion gaps in Japanese academia: Results from science and engineering," Discussion Papers 1522, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
    2. Shingo Takahashi & Ana Maria Takahashi, 2009. "Gender Promotion Differences in Economics Departments in Japan: A Semi-parametric Duration Analysis," Working Papers EMS_2009_09, Research Institute, International University of Japan.
    3. Nitzan Peri-Rotem, 2019. "Gendered Career Pathways among Doctoral Graduates in the United Kingdom," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(11), pages 1-14, November.
    4. Juho Jokinen & Jaakko Pehkonen, 2017. "Promotions and Earnings – Gender or Merit? Evidence from Longitudinal Personnel Data," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 38(3), pages 306-334, September.
    5. Takahashi, Ana Maria & Takahashi, Shingo, 2015. "Gender promotion differences in economics departments in Japan: A duration analysis," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 1-19.
    6. Brooks, Chris & Fenton, Evelyn M. & Walker, James T., 2014. "Gender and the evaluation of research," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(6), pages 990-1001.

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