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Gender Promotion Gap in Japanese Academia in 2004-2013: Has It Change Over Time?

Author

Listed:
  • Ana Maria Takahashi

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University)

  • Shingo Takahashi

    () (Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation)

  • Atsuko Ueda

    () (School of Political Science and Economics)

Abstract

Using a complete survey of the entire faculty covering 2004 to 2013, we examine the gender promotion gap in Japanese academia and assess how it changed over time. The gap at the full professor rank in national and local public universities stayed constant at slightly above 7 percentage points, while the gap in private universities exhibited a mild increase from 5.9 to 8.1 percentage points. When we combine all universities, the gap shows a slight increase from 6.9 to 7.8 percentage points. Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields and social science fields in public universities have significantly higher gaps than other fields. We do not find consistent evidence that the two governmental grants, the ‘Grant Program for Supporting Female Researchers’ and the ‘Grant Program to Accelerate the Reform of Training Female Researchers’, that aimed to foster female academics’ careers, have reduced the gender promotion gaps. We also find no evidence that these grants increased the department level share of female faculty. JEL Classification: J7

Suggested Citation

  • Ana Maria Takahashi & Shingo Takahashi & Atsuko Ueda, 2019. "Gender Promotion Gap in Japanese Academia in 2004-2013: Has It Change Over Time?," Discussion Papers 1914, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
  • Handle: RePEc:koe:wpaper:1914
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    File URL: http://www.econ.kobe-u.ac.jp/RePEc/koe/wpaper/20191217/1914.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    2. Noriyuki Morichika & Sotaro Shibayama, 2015. "Impact of inbreeding on scientific productivity: A case study of a Japanese university department," Research Evaluation, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(2), pages 146-157.
    3. Betsey Stevenson & Justin Wolfers, 2008. "Economic Growth and Subjective Well-Being: Reassessing the Easterlin Paradox," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 39(1 (Spring), pages 1-102.
    4. Takahashi, Ana Maria & Takahashi, Shingo, 2011. "Gender salary differences in economics departments in Japan," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1306-1319.
    5. Kahn, Shulamit, 1993. "Gender Differences in Academic Career Paths of Economists," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 52-56, May.
    6. Takahashi, Ana Maria & Takahashi, Shingo, 2015. "Gender promotion differences in economics departments in Japan: A duration analysis," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 1-19.
    7. Katz, David A, 1973. "Faculty Salaries, Promotion, and Productivity at a Large University," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(3), pages 469-477, June.
    8. Ana Maria Takahashi & Shingo Takahashi, 2010. "The effect of refereed articles on salary, promotion and labor mobility: The case of Japanese economists," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(1), pages 330-350.
    9. Donna K. Ginther & Shulamit Kahn, 2004. "Women in Economics: Moving Up or Falling Off the Academic Career Ladder?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(3), pages 193-214, Summer.
    10. McNabb, Robert & Wass, Victoria, 1997. "Male-Female Salary Differentials in British Universities," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(3), pages 328-343, July.
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    12. Donna K. Ginther & Kathy J. Hayes, 2003. "Gender Differences in Salary and Promotion for Faculty in the Humanities 1977–95," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(1).
    13. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:30:y:2010:i:1:p:330-350 is not listed on IDEAS
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    JEL classification:

    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination

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