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The effect of refereed articles on salary, promotion and labor mobility: The case of Japanese economists


  • Ana Maria Takahashi

    () (University of Utah, US)

  • Shingo Takahashi

    () (International University of Japan, Japan)


By using a data set of academic economists from Japanese universities, we estimated the effect of refereed articles on salary, promotion and labor mobility. Results show no effect of refereed articles on salary and on promotion. However, there is a statistically significant effect of refereed articles on labor mobility, though the magnitude of the effect is rather small. Publishing one additional refereed article increases the probability that an academic has worked in exactly two universities by 0.4%. In addition, publishing one additional refereed article in the US or Europe increases the probability that an academic has worked in exactly two universities by 1%. Refereed articles published in Japan have no statistically significant impact on the probability of working in more universities. We conclude that publishing refereed articles does not reward Japanese economists by a direct increase in salary and accelerated promotion. Our results are thus consistent with the beliefs within Japanese academia that publications do not affect salary or promotion.

Suggested Citation

  • Ana Maria Takahashi & Shingo Takahashi, 2010. "The effect of refereed articles on salary, promotion and labor mobility: The case of Japanese economists," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(1), pages 330-350.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00556

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Tom Coupé & Valérie Smeets & Frédéric Warzynski, 2006. "Incentives, Sorting and Productivity along the Career: Evidence from a Sample of Top Economists," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(1), pages 137-167, April.
    2. Katz, David A, 1973. "Faculty Salaries, Promotion, and Productivity at a Large University," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(3), pages 469-477, June.
    3. Melanie Ward, 2001. "The gender salary gap in British academia," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(13), pages 1669-1681.
    4. Monks, James & Robinson, Michael, 2000. "Gender and Racial Earnings Differentials in Academic Labor Markets," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 38(4), pages 662-671, October.
    5. Susan Washburn Taylor & Blakely Fox Fender & Kimberly Gladden Burke, 2006. "Unraveling the Academic Productivity of Economists: The Opportunity Costs of Teaching and Service," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 72(4), pages 846-859, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Geuna, Aldo & Shibayama, Sotaro, 2015. "Moving Out Of Academic Research: Why Scientists Stop Doing Research?," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201503, University of Turin.
    2. Takahashi, Ana Maria & Takahashi, Shingo, 2011. "Gender salary differences in economics departments in Japan," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1306-1319.

    More about this item


    Academic salaries; academic promotion; academic productivity; academic labor mobility; academic economists;

    JEL classification:

    • J4 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets


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