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Gender Wage Discrimination in Australia: A reassessment

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  • P.W. Miller
  • S. Rummery

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  • P.W. Miller & S. Rummery, 1989. "Gender Wage Discrimination in Australia: A reassessment," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 89-21, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwa:wpaper:89-21
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    File URL: https://ecompapers.biz.uwa.edu.au/paper/PDF%20of%20Discussion%20Papers/1989/89-21.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James J. Heckman, 1976. "The Common Structure of Statistical Models of Truncation, Sample Selection and Limited Dependent Variables and a Simple Estimator for Such Models," NBER Chapters, in: Annals of Economic and Social Measurement, Volume 5, number 4, pages 475-492, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Mincer, Jacob, 1985. "Intercountry Comparisons of Labor Force Trends and of Related Developments: An Overview," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 1-32, January.
    3. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
    4. Welch, Finis, 1975. "Human Capital Theory: Education, Discrimination, and Life Cycles," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 65(2), pages 63-73, May.
    5. Gronau, Reuben, 1974. "Wage Comparisons-A Selectivity Bias," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1119-1143, Nov.-Dec..
    6. Dolton, Peter J & Makepeace, Gerald H, 1987. "Marital Status, Child Rearing and Earnings Differentials in the Graduate Labour Market," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(388), pages 897-922, December.
    7. S. Rummery, 1989. "The Contribution of Intermittent Labour Force Participation to the Gender Wage Differential," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 89-02, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    8. Kidd, Michael P & Viney, Rosalie, 1991. "Sex Discrimination and Non-random Sampling in the Australian Labour Market," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(56), pages 28-49, June.
    9. Haig, B D, 1982. "Sex Discrimination in the Reward for Skills and Experience in the Australian Labour Force," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 58(160), pages 1-10, March.
    10. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    11. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    12. Wright, Robert E & Ermisch, John F, 1991. "Gender Discrimination in the British Labour Market: A Reassessment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(406), pages 508-522, May.
    13. Daniel M. Shapiro & Morton Stelcner, 1981. "Male-Female Earnings Differentials and the Role of Language in Canada, Ontario, and Quebec, 1970," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 14(2), pages 341-348, May.
    14. Greene, William H, 1981. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error: Comment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(3), pages 795-798, May.
    15. Dolton, P J & Makepeace, G H, 1986. "Sample Selection and Male-Female Earnings Differentials in the Graduate Labour Market," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(2), pages 317-341, July.
    16. Paul W. Miller, 1987. "Gender Differences in Observed and Offered Wages in Canada, 1980," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 20(2), pages 225-244, May.
    17. Berger, Mark C. & Glenn, Darrell E., 1986. "Selectivity bias and earnings differences by gender and race," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 291-296.
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