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Research Funding, Experience, and Seniority in Academia

  • Nelson, Paul A.
  • Monson, Terry
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    Research funding as a measure of faculty productivity has not been incorporated into previous studies of academic salary profiles. Here, we examine the effects of research funding, as well as publications, at a mid-sized, non-unionized, science and engineering-focused, American public university. Our conclusions are that research funding is more significant than publications in explaining salary differences for engineering and hard science faculty members; in contrast, only publications contribute to salary differences for faculty members in other disciplines. In addition, returns to seniority are generally nil or negative, which corroborate most other studies of this nature. Higher graduate and lower undergraduate student credit hour generation are associated with increased salaries in disciplines (in this case, engineering and the hard sciences) that have been expanding their graduate programs, but have no impact upon salaries in other disciplines.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/50284
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    Article provided by Review of Applied Economics in its journal Review of Applied Economics.

    Volume (Year): 2 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:reapec:50284
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.lincoln.ac.nz/story11874.html

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    1. James Monks & Michael Robinson, 2001. "The Returns to Seniority in Academic Labor Markets," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 22(2), pages 415-427, April.
    2. Byron W. Brown & Stephen A. Woodbury, . "Seniority, External Labor Markets, and Faculty Pay," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles bbsaw1999, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    3. Hoffman, Emily P, 1976. "Faculty Salaries: Is There Discrimination by Sex, Race, and Discipline? Additional Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(1), pages 196-98, March.
    4. Kevin Hallock, 1994. "Seniority and Monopsony in the Academic Labor Market: Comment," Working Papers 715, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    5. McNabb, Robert & Wass, Victoria, 1997. "Male-Female Salary Differentials in British Universities," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(3), pages 328-43, July.
    6. Abraham, Katharine G & Farber, Henry S, 1987. "Job Duration, Seniority, and Earnings," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(3), pages 278-97, June.
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