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Research productivity and career status


  • D. G. Mein


Measurement of the productivity of economists, economics departments at universities and economics institutes has a tradition, which dates back to the 1950s. This study attempts to show that such measurement can be used to explain long-run changes in the overall productivity of university departments and institutes involved in research. The underlying notion in this study is that the productivity of departments and institutes in terms of total output (publications) decreases when the productivity of research staff members and their position (career status) in their departments or institutes do not correlate well. The empirical data used by this study relates to an economics research institute and cover a period of 30 years. The hypothesis that a mismatch between productivity and position leads to a decline in the overall productivity of departments and institutes could not be refuted.

Suggested Citation

  • D. G. Mein, 2002. "Research productivity and career status," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(12), pages 809-815.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:9:y:2002:i:12:p:809-815 DOI: 10.1080/13504850210141708

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Toda, Hiro Y & Phillips, Peter C B, 1993. "Vector Autoregressions and Causality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(6), pages 1367-1393, November.
    2. Razzolini, Laura & Shughart, William F, II, 1997. "On the (Relative) Unimportance of a Balanced Budget," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 90(1-4), pages 215-233, March.
    3. Francesco Daveri & Guido Tabellini, 2000. "Unemployment, growth and taxation in industrial countries," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 15(30), pages 47-104, April.
    4. Toda, Hiro Y. & Yamamoto, Taku, 1995. "Statistical inference in vector autoregressions with possibly integrated processes," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1-2), pages 225-250.
    5. Tsionas, Efthymios G., 2001. "P-STAR analysis in a converging economy: the case of Greece," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 49-60, January.
    6. Efthymios Tsionas & George Halkos, 2000. "Posterior Analysis of Environmental Damage Evaluation in Europe," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 371-390.
    7. Abrams, Burton A, 1999. "The Effect of Government Size on the Unemployment Rate," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 99(3-4), pages 395-401, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Raúl Ramos & Vicente Royuela & Jordi Suriñach, 2007. "An analysis of the determinants in Economics and Business publications by Spanish universities between 1994 and 2004," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 71(1), pages 117-144, April.
    2. Mirucki, Jean & Poshyvak, Maria, 2006. ""Ukraine" in scholarly publications: An analysis based on econLit," MPRA Paper 29090, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Valadkhani, Abbas & Ville, Simon, 2006. "Modelling the Research Output of Australian Universities by Discipline," Economics Working Papers wp06-26, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
    4. Stanley, T.D. & Doucouliagos, Chris & Jarrell, Stephen B., 2008. "Meta-regression analysis as the socio-economics of economics research," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 276-292, February.

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