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The Value of Peripatetic Economists: A Sesqui-Difference Evaluation of Bob Gregory

  • DANIEL S. HAMERMESH

Does a country benefit from temporarily importing human capital? Do foreign academic visitors generate additional scholarly research on local issues? I use a survey in which visitors to ANU's Economics Program described their research before and after their visit and designated an otherwise similar non-visitor as a control. Matching to controls may thus be along observable and unobservable characteristics. These visits have a highly significant impact on the visitor's subsequent research, redirecting it toward Australia. Valuing this extra research based on scholarly citations received and the effects of citations on salaries shows substantial monetary gains. Copyright © 2006 The Economic Society of Australia.

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Article provided by The Economic Society of Australia in its journal Economic Record.

Volume (Year): 82 (2006)
Issue (Month): 257 (06)
Pages: 138-149

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Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:82:y:2006:i:257:p:138-149
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  7. Bound, John, 1989. "The Health and Earnings of Rejected Disability Insurance Applicants," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(3), pages 482-503, June.
  8. Ronald G. Ehrenberg & Daniel Hamermesh & George E. Johnson, 1977. "Policy decisions and research in economics and industrial relations. An exchange of views," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 31(1), pages 10, October.
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