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Which Journal Rankings Best Explain Academic Salaries? Evidence From The University Of California

Listed author(s):
  • JOHN GIBSON
  • DAVID L. ANDERSON
  • JOHN TRESSLER

type="main" xml:id="ecin12107-abs-0001"> The ranking of an academic journal is important to authors, universities, journal publishers, and research funders. Rankings are gaining prominence as countries adopt regular research assessment exercises that especially reward publication in high-impact journals. Yet even within a rankings-oriented discipline like economics there is no agreement on how aggressively lower-ranked journals are down-weighted and in how wide is the universe of journals considered. Moreover, since it is typically less costly for authors to cite superfluous references, whether of their own volition or prompted by editors, than it is to ignore relevant ones, rankings based on citations may be easily manipulated. In contrast, when the merits of publication in one journal or another are debated during hiring, promotion, and salary decisions, the evaluators are choosing over actions with costly consequences. We therefore look to the academic labor market, using data on economists in the University of California system to relate their lifetime publications in 700 different academic journals to salary. We test amongst various sets of journal rankings, and publication discount rates, to see which are most congruent with the returns implied by the academic labor market. (JEL A14, I23, J44)

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/ecin.2014.52.issue-4
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Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Economic Inquiry.

Volume (Year): 52 (2014)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 1322-1340

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Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:52:y:2014:i:4:p:1322-1340
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  1. Pantelis Kalaitzidakis & Theofanis P. Mamuneas & Thanasis Stengos, 2011. "An updated ranking of academic journals in economics," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 44(4), pages 1525-1538, November.
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  4. Chia-Lin Chang & Michael McAleer & Les Oxley, 2010. "What Makes a Great Journal Great in Economics? The Singer Not the Song," KIER Working Papers 706, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
  5. Pierre-Philippe Combes & Laurent Linnemer, 2010. "Inferring Missing Citations: A Quantitative Multi-Criteria Ranking of all Journals in Economics," Working Papers halshs-00520325, HAL.
  6. Liebowitz, S J & Palmer, J P, 1984. "Assessing the Relative Impacts of Economic Journals," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 22(1), pages 77-88, March.
  7. Glenn Ellison, 2010. "How Does the Market Use Citation Data? The Hirsch Index in Economics," NBER Working Papers 16419, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. John Gibson, 2000. "Research productivity in New Zealand university economics departments: Comment and update," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 73-87.
  9. Pantelis Kalaitzidakis & Theofanis P Mamuneas & Thanasis Stengos, 2001. "Rankings of Academic Journals and Institutions in Economics," Discussion Papers in Economics 01/8, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  10. Christiana E. Hilmer & Michael J. Hilmer, 2005. "How Do Journal Quality, Co-Authorship, and Author Order Affect Agricultural Economists' Salaries?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(2), pages 509-523.
  11. Sauer, Raymond D, 1988. "Estimates of the Returns to Quality and Coauthorship in Economic Academia," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(4), pages 855-866, August.
  12. M. H. Pesaran, 1974. "On the General Problem of Model Selection," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 41(2), pages 153-171.
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