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The Gender Earnings Gap in British Workplaces: A Knowledge Exchange Report

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  • Tim Butcher
  • Karen Mumford
  • Peter N. Smith

Abstract

The gender earnings gap in Britain currently sits at some 18%, it has declined over time (Dickens 2007) but has also displayed considerable persistence over the last two decades. There is significant and continuing debate as to the determinants of the gap and how these have also developed over time. In addition to new material, this report includes and updates results presented in Butcher et al. (2016) and Mumford and Smith (2007 and 2009). We use the latest release of the Workplace Employee Relations Survey (WERS11) to explore the determinants of the gender earning gaps between males and females in Britain allowing us to take account of a wide range of the key causes of the scale of the gap.

Suggested Citation

  • Tim Butcher & Karen Mumford & Peter N. Smith, 2019. "The Gender Earnings Gap in British Workplaces: A Knowledge Exchange Report," Discussion Papers 19/10, Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:yorken:19/10
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender pay gap; discrimination; wages;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J00 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - General
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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