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New Evidence on Sex Segregation and Sex Differences in Wages from Matched Employee-Employer Data

Author

Listed:
  • Kimberly Bayard

    (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System)

  • Judith Hellerstein

    (University of Maryland and National Bureau of Economic Research)

  • David Neumark

    (Public Policy Institute of California, Michigan State University, and National Bureau of Economic Research)

  • Kenneth Troske

    (University of MissouriColumbia and the Institute for the Study of Labor)

Abstract

We use new matched employer-employee data to estimate the contributions of sex segregation and wage differences by sex within occupation, industry, establishment, and occupation-establishment cells to the overall sex gap in wages. In contrast to earlier data used to study this question, our data cover all industries and occupations across all regions of the United States. We find that segregation of women into lower-paying occupations, industries, establishments, and occupations within establishments accounts for a sizable fraction of the sex gap in wages. Nonetheless, approximately one-half of the sex gap in wages remains attributable to the individual's sex.

Suggested Citation

  • Kimberly Bayard & Judith Hellerstein & David Neumark & Kenneth Troske, 2003. "New Evidence on Sex Segregation and Sex Differences in Wages from Matched Employee-Employer Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(4), pages 887-922, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:21:y:2003:i:4:p:887-922
    DOI: 10.1086/377026
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    References listed on IDEAS

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