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An investigation of the relationship between job characteristics and the gender wage gap

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Abstract

This paper re-examines gender wage differences, taking into account not only worker characteristics but also job characteristics. Consideration of a wide set of “job quality” indicators can explain a fraction of the wage gap that would otherwise be attributed to pure wage discrimination. In any case, the fraction of the wage gap that remains associated to differential rewards for identical factors across sexes is still substantial. Our results suggest that in order to avoid overestimation of the fraction of the wage gap attributable to discrimination, it is necessary to control for job characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Jaume Garcia Villar & Pedro J. Hernández & Ángel López-Nicolás, 2002. "An investigation of the relationship between job characteristics and the gender wage gap," Economics Working Papers 627, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  • Handle: RePEc:upf:upfgen:627
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Macpherson, David A & Hirsch, Barry T, 1995. "Wages and Gender Composition: Why Do Women's Jobs Pay Less?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(3), pages 426-471, July.
    2. Miller, Paul W, 1987. "The Wage Effect of the Occupational Segregation of Women in Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(388), pages 885-896, December.
    3. Alan S. Blinder, 1973. "Wage Discrimination: Reduced Form and Structural Estimates," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 8(4), pages 436-455.
    4. Neuman, Shoshana & Oaxaca, Ronald L, 1998. "Estimating Labour Market Discrimination with Selectivity Corrected Wage Equations: Methodological Considerations and an Illustration from Israel," CEPR Discussion Papers 1915, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Dolton, P J & Makepeace, G H & Van Der Klaauw, W, 1989. "Occupational Choice and Earnings Determination: The Role of Sample Selection and Non-pecuniary Factors," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 41(3), pages 573-594, July.
    6. Kimberly Bayard & Judith Hellerstein & David Neumark & Kenneth Troske, 2003. "New Evidence on Sex Segregation and Sex Differences in Wages from Matched Employee-Employer Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(4), pages 887-922, October.
    7. Lee, Lung-Fei, 1983. "Generalized Econometric Models with Selectivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(2), pages 507-512, March.
    8. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    9. Sara de la Rica & Arantza Ugidos, 1995. "¿Son las diferencias en capital humano determinantes en las diferencias salariales observadas entre hombres y mujeres?," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 19(3), pages 395-414, September.
    10. David Neumark, 1988. "Employers' Discriminatory Behavior and the Estimation of Wage Discrimination," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 23(3), pages 279-295.
    11. Johnson, George & Solon, Gary, 1986. "Estimates of the Direct Effects of Comparable Worth Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(5), pages 1117-1125, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Datta Gupta, Nabanita & Tor, Eriksson, 2005. "New workplace practices and the gender wage gap," Working Papers 04-18, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    2. Datta Gupta, Nabanita & Eriksson, Tor, 2006. "New Workplace Practices and the Gender Wage Gap: Can the New Economy be the Great Equalizer?," IZA Discussion Papers 2038, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Wage diferentials;

    JEL classification:

    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination
    • C4 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics

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