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New workplace practices and the gender wage gap

We explore the effect of introducing new workplace practices on the gender gap using a unique 1999 survey on work and compensation practices of Danish private sector firms merged to a large matched employer-employee database. Self-managed teams, project organisation and job rotation schemes are the most widely implemented work practices. Wage gains from adopting new workplace practices accrue mainly to hourly paid males and salaried females but do not generate large changes in the gender gap in pay at the level of the firm. Considering practices individually, however, the gender wage gap among salaried workers is significantly reduced in firms which offer job rotation and project organisation, while among hourly paid workers the use of quality control circles significantly widens the gap in pay between male and female workers.

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File URL: http://www.hha.dk/nat/wper/04-18_ndgte.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 04-18.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: 02 Sep 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:aareco:2004_018
Contact details of provider: Postal: The Aarhus School of Business, Prismet, Silkeborgvej 2, DK 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
Phone: +45 89 486396
Fax: +45 8615 5175
Web page: http://www.asb.dk/departments/nat.aspx
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  1. Sandra E Black & Lisa M Lynch, 2002. "What's Driving the New Economy? The Benefits of Workplace Innovation," Working Papers 02-03, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  2. Lausten, M., 2001. "Gender differences in managerial compensation - Evidences from Denmark," Papers 01-4, Aarhus School of Business - Department of Economics.
  3. Gubta, Nabanita Datta & Rothstein, Donna S., 2001. "The Impact of Worker and Establishment-level Characteristics on Male-Female Wage Differentials: Evidence from Danish Matched Employee-Employer Data," CLS Working Papers 01-9, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Centre for Labour Market and Social Research.
  4. Daniel Parent, 1999. "Methods of pay and earnings: A longitudinal analysis," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 53(1), pages 71-86, October.
  5. Jaume Garcia Villar & Pedro J. Hernández & Ángel López-Nicolás, 2002. "An investigation of the relationship between job characteristics and the gender wage gap," Economics Working Papers 627, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
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