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Human Capital Accumulation And The Transition From Specialization To Multitasking

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  • BOUCEKKINE, RAOUF
  • CRIFO, PATRICIA

Abstract

This paper provides theoretical foundations to the contemporaneous increase in computer usage, human capital and multi-tasking observed in many OECD countries during the 1990s. The links between work organization, technology and human capital is modelled by establishing the conditions under which firms allocate the workers’ time among several productive tasks. Organizational change is then analysed in a dynamic perspective as the transition from specialization towards multi-tasking emphasizing its technological and educational determinants
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(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

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  • Boucekkine, Raouf & Crifo, Patricia, 2008. "Human Capital Accumulation And The Transition From Specialization To Multitasking," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(03), pages 320-344, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:macdyn:v:12:y:2008:i:03:p:320-344_07
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Crifo, Patricia, 2003. "La modélisation du changement organisationnel : déterminants et conséquences sur le marché du travail," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 79(3), pages 349-365, Septembre.
    2. Vallée, Thomas & Moreno-Galbis, Eva, 2011. "Optimal time switching from tayloristic to holistic workplace organization," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 238-246, September.
    3. Hiller, Victor, 2011. "Work organization, preferences dynamics and the industrialization process," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(7), pages 1007-1025.
    4. Raouf Boucekkine & Natali Hritonenko & Yuri Yatsenko, 2013. "Health, Work Intensity, and Technological Innovations," AMSE Working Papers 1320, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France, revised Mar 2013.
    5. Pikos, Anna Katharina, 2017. "The task composition and work-related mental health - a descriptive study," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-610, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    6. DeVaro, Jed & Farnham, Martin, 2011. "Two perspectives on multiskilling and product-market volatility," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 862-871.
    7. Pikos, Anna Katharina, 2017. "The causal effect of multitasking on work-related mental health - the more you do, the worse you feel," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-609, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    8. Raouf BOUCEKKINE & Patricia, CRIFO & Claudio, MATTALIA, 2007. "Technological Progress, Organizational Change and the Size of the Human Resources Departement," Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) 2007047, Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques.
    9. Eichhorst, Werner & Kendzia, Michael J. & Schneider, Hilmar & Buhlmann, Florian, 2013. "Report No. 51: Neue Anforderungen durch den Wandel der Arbeitswelt," IZA Research Reports 51, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • L23 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Organization of Production
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • C62 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Existence and Stability Conditions of Equilibrium

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