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Task-Specific Training and Job Design

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  • Felipe Balmaceda

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Abstract

This paper provides a simple theoretical framework based on a new type of human capital introduced by Gibbons and Waldman (2004), called task-specific training, to understand job design. Mainly, in the presence of task-specific training, promotions might result ex-post in the underutilization of human capital and thus firms at the time of designing jobs should attempt to diversify this risk.

Suggested Citation

  • Felipe Balmaceda, 2006. "Task-Specific Training and Job Design," Documentos de Trabajo 223, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
  • Handle: RePEc:edj:ceauch:223
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    File URL: http://www.dii.uchile.cl/~cea/sitedev/cea/www/download.php?file=documentos_trabajo/ASOCFILE120060818150925.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Felipe Balmaceda, 2008. "Firm-Provided Training and Labor Market Policies," Documentos de Trabajo 252, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
    2. Chowdhury, Sanjib & Schulz, Eric & Milner, Morgan & Van De Voort, David, 2014. "Core employee based human capital and revenue productivity in small firms: An empirical investigation," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 67(11), pages 2473-2479.

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