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The Adoption and Diffusion of Organizational Innovation: Evidence for the U.S. Economy

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  • Lisa Lynch

Abstract

Using a unique longitudinal representative survey of both manufacturing and nonmanufacturing businesses in the United States during the 1990’s, I examine the incidence and intensity of organizational innovation and the factors associated with investments in organizational innovation. Past profits tend to be positively associated with organizational innovation. Employers with a more external focus and broader networks to learn about best practices (as proxied by exports, benchmarking, and being part of a multi-establishment firm) are more likely to invest in organizational innovation. Investments in human capital, information technology, R&D, and physical capital appear to be complementary with investments in organizational innovation. In addition, nonunionized manufacturing plants are more likely to have invested more broadly and intensely in organizational innovation.

Suggested Citation

  • Lisa Lynch, 2007. "The Adoption and Diffusion of Organizational Innovation: Evidence for the U.S. Economy," Working Papers 07-18, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  • Handle: RePEc:cen:wpaper:07-18
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sandra E. Black & Lisa M. Lynch, 2004. "What's driving the new economy?: the benefits of workplace innovation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(493), pages 97-116, February.
    2. Lisa M. Lynch & Sandra E. Black, 1995. "Beyond the Incidence of Training: Evidence from a National Employers Survey," NBER Working Papers 5231, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Sandra E. Black & Lisa M. Lynch, 2001. "How To Compete: The Impact Of Workplace Practices And Information Technology On Productivity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(3), pages 434-445, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Frank Butter & Jan Möhlmann & Paul Wit, 2008. "Trade and product innovations as sources for productivity increases: an empirical analysis," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 201-211, December.
    2. López, Alberto, 2012. "Productivity effects of ICTs and organizational change: A test of the complementarity hypothesis in Spain," MPRA Paper 40400, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Massimiliano Mazzanti & Davide Antonioli & Susanna Mancinelli, 2011. "Are Environmental Innovations Embedded within High-Performance Organizational Changes?," Working Papers 201115, University of Ferrara, Department of Economics.
    4. Federico Biagi & Maria Laura Parisi & Lucia Vergano, 2008. "Organizational Innovations and Labor Productivity in a Panel of Italian Manufacturing Firms," Working Papers 0813, University of Brescia, Department of Economics.
    5. Michael Waldman, 2012. "Theory and Evidence in Internal Labor Markets," Introductory Chapters,in: Robert Gibbons & John Roberts (ed.), The Handbook of Organizational Economics Princeton University Press.
    6. Maliranta, Mika & Asplund, Rita, 2007. "Training and Hiring Strategies to Improve Firm Performance," Discussion Papers 1105, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    7. Nabil Bikourane & Sihame Zraoula, 2016. "Le contrôle de gestion hospitalier et innovations managériales," Post-Print hal-01900560, HAL.
    8. Luis Garicano & Paul Heaton, 2010. "Information Technology, Organization, and Productivity in the Public Sector: Evidence from Police Departments," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(1), pages 167-201, January.
    9. Kato, Takao & Owan, Hideo, 2011. "Market characteristics, intra-firm coordination, and the choice of human resource management systems: Theory and evidence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 80(3), pages 375-396.
    10. B. Atrostic, 2008. "Measuring U.S. innovative activity: business data at the U.S. Census Bureau," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 153-171, April.
    11. MOTHE Caroline & NGUYEN Thi Thuc Uyen, 2011. "Do firms rely on sources of information for organizational innovation?," LISER Working Paper Series 2011-39, LISER.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    organizational innovation; productivity; human capital; technological change;

    JEL classification:

    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • M5 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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