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The Effects of Human Resource Management on Workers' Wages and Firm Productivity

  • Grip,Andries,de
  • Sieben,Inge

    (ROA rm)

We analyze whether the effects of human resource practices on workers’ wages and firm productivity are similar or different. We find that firms’ wage policies overestimate the relevance of sector-specific skills and underestimate the productivity enhancing effect of computer skills. Moreover, only the firm benefits from performance related pay, whereas only the workers benefit from performance evaluation interviews. Finally, our estimation results show that in small firms a more advanced HRM system may not result in a convergence of interests between workers and the firm.

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File URL: http://digitalarchive.maastrichtuniversity.nl/fedora/objects/guid:0af6e25b-d7d6-4f69-9bfd-bafa29eaf2c2/datastreams/ASSET1/content
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Paper provided by Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA) in its series ROA Research Memorandum with number 001.

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Date of creation: 2004
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Handle: RePEc:unm:umaror:2004001
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  13. Ichniowski, Casey & Shaw, Kathryn & Prennushi, Giovanna, 1997. "The Effects of Human Resource Management Practices on Productivity: A Study of Steel Finishing Lines," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 291-313, June.
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  15. Casey Ichniowski & Kathryn Shaw, 2003. "Beyond Incentive Pay: Insiders' Estimates of the Value of Complementary Human Resource Management Practices," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(1), pages 155-180, Winter.
  16. Stevens, Margaret, 1994. "A Theoretical Model of On-the-Job Training with Imperfect Competition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(4), pages 537-62, October.
  17. Lazear, Edward P, 1979. "Why Is There Mandatory Retirement?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(6), pages 1261-84, December.
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  20. Gil A. Preuss, 2003. "High Performance Work Systems and Organizational Outcomes: The Mediating Role of Information Quality," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 56(4), pages 590-605, July.
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