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Gender Bias in Education in West Bengal

Author

Listed:
  • Amita Majumder

    (Indian Statistical Institute)

  • Chayanika Mitra

    () (Indian Statistical Institute)

Abstract

This paper attempts to capture gender bias at two different levels of education, namely, below class-10 and above class-10 using NSSO 64th round education expenditure data on West Bengal. The analysis for the below class-10 level involves an intra household framework and Heckman’s two step model. Further, for this section the analysis is split up into classes 1–8 and classes 9–10 in view of the Right to Education act (2005). For above class-10 level, gender bias has been captured through a multinomial logit model for selection of subjects across households.

Suggested Citation

  • Amita Majumder & Chayanika Mitra, 2017. "Gender Bias in Education in West Bengal," Journal of Quantitative Economics, Springer;The Indian Econometric Society (TIES), vol. 15(1), pages 173-196, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jqecon:v:15:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s40953-016-0038-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s40953-016-0038-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender bias; Education expenditure; Double hurdle model; Multinomial logit model;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions

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