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Sex Discrimination and Occupational Segregation in the Australian Labour Market

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  • Kidd, M.P.

Abstract

This paper explores the implications of the difference between the occupational distribution for males and females in a joint model determining earnings and occupation. The male/female wage differential is evaluated for a number of broad occupational classifications. This is followed by an evaluation of the role and relative importance of interoccupational and intraoccupational effects as contributors to the overall male/female wage differential. The main conclusion following from the econometric results is that intraoccupational effects dominate. Thus, policies that attempt to address the gender wage differential by reallocation of labor across occupations are unlikely to solve the problem. Copyright 1993 by The Economic Society of Australia.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Kidd, M.P., 1990. "Sex Discrimination and Occupational Segregation in the Australian Labour Market," Papers 1991-01, Tasmania - Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:tasman:1991-01
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    Cited by:

    1. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Tan, Michelle, 2011. "Noncognitive skills, occupational attainment, and relative wages," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 1-13, January.
    2. Lin Xiu & Morley Gunderson, 2015. "Occupational segregation and the gender earnings gap in China: devils in the details," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 36(5), pages 711-732, August.
    3. Juan D. Barón & Deborah A. Cobb-Clark, 2010. "Occupational Segregation and the Gender Wage Gap in Private- and Public-Sector Employment: A Distributional Analysis," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(273), pages 227-246, June.
    4. Mark Wooden, 1999. "Gender Pay Equity and Comparable Worth in Australia: A Reassessment," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 32(2), pages 157-171.
    5. A. Preston, 1996. "Where Are We Now With Human Capital Theory in Australia?," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 96-18, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    6. Raquel Vale Mendes, 2009. "Gender wage differentials and occupational distribution," Notas Económicas, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra, issue 29, pages 26-40, June.
    7. Pedro Orraca & Francisco Javier Cabrera & Gustavo Iriarte, 2016. "The gender wage gap and occupational segregation in the Mexican labour market," EconoQuantum, Revista de Economia y Negocios, Universidad de Guadalajara, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Economico Administrativas, Departamento de Metodos Cuantitativos y Maestria en Economia., vol. 13(1), pages 51-72, Enero-Jun.
    8. Dr Sukhan Jackson & Nerina Vecchio, 2002. "Government Policies On Employment And Superannuation: Contradictions And Consequences For Older Australians," Discussion Papers Series 308, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    9. Raquel Vale Mendes, 2005. "Occupational segregation and the Portuguese gender wage gap," ERSA conference papers ersa05p130, European Regional Science Association.

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