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Comparing Apples with Oranges: Revisiting the Gender Wage Gap in an International Perspective

Author

Listed:
  • Plasman, Robert

    (Free University of Brussels)

  • Sissoko, Salimata

    (Federal Planning Bureau, Belgium)

Abstract

Using a rich and comparable micro-data set, we analyse international differences in gender pay gaps in the private sector for a sample of five European economies: Belgium, Denmark, Ireland, Italy and Spain. Using different methods, we examine how wage structure, differences in the distribution of measured characteristics, occupational and industrial segregation contribute to explain the pattern of international differences. Furthermore, we take into account indirect discrimination influencing female occupational and industrial distributions. We find significant impacts of those latter factors on gender differentials. However, the magnitude of their effects varies across countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Plasman, Robert & Sissoko, Salimata, 2004. "Comparing Apples with Oranges: Revisiting the Gender Wage Gap in an International Perspective," IZA Discussion Papers 1449, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1449
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Brenda Gannon & Robert Plasman & Francois Rycx & Ilan Tojerow, 2007. "Inter-Industry Wage Differentials and the Gender Wage Gap: Evidence from European Countries," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 38(1), pages 135-155.
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    11. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-442, June.
    12. Connelly, Rachel, 1992. "The Effect of Child Care Costs on Married Women's Labor Force Participation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(1), pages 83-90, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bernal, Oscar & Oosterlinck, Kim & Szafarz, Ariane, 2010. "Observing bailout expectations during a total eclipse of the sun," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(7), pages 1193-1205, November.
    2. Brenda Gannon & Robert Plasman & Francois Rycx & Ilan Tojerow, 2007. "Inter-Industry Wage Differentials and the Gender Wage Gap: Evidence from European Countries," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 38(1), pages 135-155.
    3. repec:kap:iaecre:v:19:y:2013:i:4:p:331-354 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Dorota Witkowska, 2013. "Gender Disparities in the Labor Market in the EU," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 19(4), pages 331-354, November.
    5. Danièle Meulders & Robert Plasman & François Rycx, 2005. "Les inégalités salariales de genre : expliquer l'injustifiable ou justifier l'inexplicable," Reflets et perspectives de la vie économique, De Boeck Université, vol. 0(2), pages 95-107.
    6. Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2008. "Occupational and industrial segregation of female and male workers in Spain: An alternative approach," Working Papers 84, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    7. Coral Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2010. "Gender Segregation in the Spanish Labor Market: An Alternative Approach," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 98(2), pages 337-362, September.
    8. Charles Plaigin, 2009. "Exploratory study on the presence of cultural and institutional growth spillovers," DULBEA Working Papers 09-03.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    9. Raquel Vale Mendes, 2009. "Gender wage differentials and occupational distribution," Notas Económicas, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra, issue 29, pages 26-40, June.
    10. Maritza López-Novella & Salimata Sissoko, 2009. "Working Paper 12-09 - Salaires et négociation collective en Belgique : une analyse microéconomique en panel," Working Papers 0912, Federal Planning Bureau, Belgium.
    11. Pierre-Guillaume Méon & Ariane Szafarz, 2008. "Labour market discrimination as an agency cost," Working Papers CEB 08-019.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    12. Campos-Soria, Juan Antonio & Ortega Aguaza, Bienvenido & Ropero-García, Miguel Ángel, 2010. "Diferentes patrones de segregación género y diferencia salarial entre hombres y mujeres en la hostelería/Different Patterns of Gender Segregation and Wage Gap Between Men and Women in Hospitality Sect," Estudios de Economia Aplicada, Estudios de Economia Aplicada, vol. 28, pages 197(30á)-19, Abril.
    13. Carlos Gradín & Coral del Río, 2009. "Aspectos distributivos de las diferencias salariales por razón de género en España: un análisis por subgrupos poblacionales," Hacienda Pública Española / Review of Public Economics, IEF, vol. 189(2), pages 9-46, June.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender wage gap; wage structure; occupational segregation; industrial segregation; discrimination;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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