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Occupational segregation of immigrant women in Spain

Author

Listed:
  • Coral del Río

    (Universidade de Vigo)

  • Olga Alonso-Villar

    () (Universidade de Vigo)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to analyze occupational segregation in the Spanish labor market from a gender and an immigration perspective. In doing so, several local and overall segregation measures are used. Our results suggest that immigrant women in Spain suffer a double segregation since segregation affects them to a greater extent than it does either native women or immigrant men. There are, however, remarkable discrepancies among the segregation of immigrant women depending on their region of origin. Thus, immigrant women from the European Union (EU) have the lowest occupational segregation, while segregation seems particularly intense in the group of women from European countries outside the EU bloc and Asia (the levels of which are higher than that of Latin American and African women).

Suggested Citation

  • Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2010. "Occupational segregation of immigrant women in Spain," Working Papers 165, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  • Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2010-165
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    File URL: http://www.ecineq.org/milano/WP/ECINEQ2010-165.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pablo Vazquez Vega & Mario Alloza & Raquel Vegas & Stefano Bertozzi, 2009. "Impact of the Rise in immigrant unemployment on public finances," Working Papers 2009-15, FEDEA.
    2. Robert Plasman & Salimata Sissoko Ndeye, 2005. "The gender wage gap in an international perspective," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 48(4), pages 419-442.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Coral del Río & Olga Alonso Villar, 2013. "Mujeres ante el empleo (y el desempleo) en el mercado laboral español," Working Papers 1305, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada.
    2. Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2010. "Occupational segregation measures: A role for status," Working Papers 167, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    3. Olga Alonso Villar & Coral del Río, 2010. "Segregation of female and male workers in Spain: occupations and industries," Hacienda Pública Española / Review of Public Economics, IEF, vol. 194(3), pages 91-121, June.
    4. Olga Alonso-Villar & Coral Río, 2013. "Occupational segregation in a country of recent mass immigration: evidence from Spain," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 50(1), pages 109-134, February.
    5. Enrique Fernández-Macías & Rafael Grande & Alberto Rey Poveda & José-Ignacio Antón, 2015. "Employment and Occupational Mobility among Recently Arrived Immigrants: The Spanish Case 1997–2007," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 34(2), pages 243-277, April.
    6. Aldaz Odriozola, Leire & Eguía Peña, Begoña, 2016. "Segregación laboral por género en España y en el País Vasco. Un análisis de cohortes /Occupational Segregation by Sex in Spain and in the Basque Country. A Cohort Analysis," Estudios de Economia Aplicada, Estudios de Economia Aplicada, vol. 34, pages 133-154, Enero.
    7. Fitzsimmons, Stacey R. & Baggs, Jen & Brannen, Mary Yoko, 2020. "Intersectional arithmetic: How gender, race and mother tongue combine to impact immigrants’ work outcomes," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 55(1).
    8. Inmaculada García-Mainar & Guillermo García-Martín & Víctor Montuenga, 2015. "Over-education and Gender Occupational Differences in Spain," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 124(3), pages 807-833, December.
    9. Olga Alonso-Villar & Coral del Río & Carlos Gradín, 2010. "The extent of occupational segregation in the US: Differences by race, ethnicity, and gender," Working Papers 180, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigration; gender; occupational segregation; local segregation; overall segregation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

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