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Occupational segregation in a country of recent mass immigration: evidence from Spain

  • Olga Alonso-Villar


  • Coral Río

The aim of this paper is to study the occupational segregation of immigrants in Spain. It analyzes whether age, educational level, gender, region of origin, and years of residence in Spain affect the distribution of immigrants across occupations. In addition, given the remarkable increase of immigrants in the last few years and the adjustments that have occurred in the Spanish labor market from the current economic crisis, the evolution of the occupational segregation of immigrants between 1996 and 2009 is addressed. For these purposes, several measures recently proposed in the literature are used. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2013

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Article provided by Springer in its journal The Annals of Regional Science.

Volume (Year): 50 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 109-134

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Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:50:y:2013:i:1:p:109-134
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  1. Silber, Jacques G., 1989. "On the measurement of employment segregation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 237-243, September.
  2. Karmel, T & Maclachlan, M, 1988. "Occupational Sex Segregation--Increasing or Decreasing?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 64(186), pages 187-95, September.
  3. Judith Hellerstein & David Neumark, 2006. "Workplace Segregation in the United States: Race, Ethnicity, and Skill," Working Papers 060710, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics.
  4. Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2010. "Occupational segregation of immigrant women in Spain," Working Papers 165, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  5. Bentolila, Samuel & Dolado, Juan J. & Jimeno, Juan F, 2007. "Does Immigration Affect the Phillips Curve? Some Evidence for Spain," CEPR Discussion Papers 6604, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Izquierdo, Mario & Lacuesta, Aitor & Vegas, Raquel, 2009. "Assimilation of immigrants in Spain: A longitudinal analysis," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(6), pages 669-678, December.
  7. Robert Hutchens, 2004. "One Measure of Segregation," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 45(2), pages 555-578, 05.
  8. M. Dolores Collado & IÒigo Iturbe-Ormaetxe & Guadalupe Valera, 2004. "Quantifying the Impact of Immigration on the Spanish Welfare State," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 335-353, 05.
  9. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & de la Rica, Sara, 2011. "Complements or substitutes? Task specialization by gender and nativity in Spain," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 697-707, October.
  10. Coral Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2010. "Gender Segregation in the Spanish Labor Market: An Alternative Approach," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 98(2), pages 337-362, September.
  11. Raquel Carrasco & Juan Jimeno & A. Ortega, 2008. "The effect of immigration on the labor market performance of native-born workers: some evidence for Spain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 21(3), pages 627-648, July.
  12. Olga Alonso-Villar & Coral del Río, 2008. "Local versus overall segregation measures," Working Papers 0802, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada.
  13. Silber, Jacques, 1992. "Occupational Segregation Indices in the Multidimensional Case: A Note," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 68(202), pages 276-77, September.
  14. Cristina Fernández & Ana Carolina Ortega Masagué, 2006. "Labor Market Assimilation of Immigrants in Spain: Employment at the Expense of Bad Job-Matches?," Working Papers 2006-21, FEDEA.
  15. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Sara de la Rica, 2007. "Labour Market Assimilation of Recent Immigrants in Spain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 45(2), pages 257-284, 06.
  16. Spriggs, William E & Williams, Rhonda M, 1996. "A Logit Decomposition Analysis of Occupational Segregation: Results for the 1970s and 1980s," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(2), pages 348-55, May.
  17. Jaai Parasnis, 2006. "Segregation In The Australian Labour Market ," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(4), pages 318-332, December.
  18. Frankel, David M. & Volij, Oscar, 2010. "Measuring School Segregation," Staff General Research Papers 31808, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  19. Hutchens, Robert, 2001. "Numerical measures of segregation: desirable properties and their implications," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 13-29, July.
  20. Simón, Hipólito & Ramos, Raul & Sanromá, Esteban, 2011. "Occupational Mobility of Immigrants in a Low Skilled Economy: The Spanish Case," IZA Discussion Papers 5581, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  21. Pablo Vazquez Vega & Mario Alloza & Raquel Vegas & Stefano Bertozzi, 2009. "Impact of the Rise in immigrant unemployment on public finances," Working Papers 2009-15, FEDEA.
  22. Pascale Joassart-Marcelli, 2009. "The Spatial Determinants Of Wage Inequality: Evidence From Recent Latina Immigrants In Southern California," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 33-72.
  23. Herve Queneau, 2009. "Trends in occupational segregation by race and ethnicity in the USA: evidence from detailed data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(13), pages 1347-1350.
  24. Hipólito Simón & Esteban Sanromá & Raúl Ramos, 2008. "Labour segregation and immigrant and native-born wage distributions in Spain: an analysis using matched employer–employee data," Spanish Economic Review, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 135-168, June.
  25. Randy P. Albelda, 1986. "Occupational segregation by race and gender, 1958û1981," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 39(3), pages 404-411, April.
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