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Trends in occupational segregation by race and ethnicity in the USA: evidence from detailed data

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  • Herve Queneau

Abstract

This article analyses trends in occupational segregation by race and ethnicity in the USA over the period 1983 to 2002. During this period, racial segregation markedly declined, while there was a fairly sizable increase in ethnic segregation. Almost all the changes in racial and ethnic segregation were due to the racial or ethnic composition effect. This finding is important since the composition effect truly measures the change in racial or ethnic segregation by eliminating the effect of changes in the size of occupations. During the period 1983-2002, the service, managerial, sales, operators and professional specialty occupations contributed the most to the decline in segregation between Blacks and NonBlacks, while the service, production and farming occupations contributed the most to the increase in segregation between Hispanics and NonHispanics.

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  • Herve Queneau, 2009. "Trends in occupational segregation by race and ethnicity in the USA: evidence from detailed data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(13), pages 1347-1350.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:16:y:2009:i:13:p:1347-1350 DOI: 10.1080/13504850701367346
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    Cited by:

    1. Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2014. "The Evolution of Occupational Segregation in the U.S., 1940-2010: Gains and Losses of Gender- Race/ethnicity Groups," Working Papers 1405, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada.
    2. Olga Alonso-Villar & Coral del Rio, 2013. "The occupational segregation of Black women in the United States: A look at its evolution from 1940 to 2010," Working Papers 304, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    3. Olga Alonso-Villar & Coral Río, 2013. "Occupational segregation in a country of recent mass immigration: evidence from Spain," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, pages 109-134.
    4. Carlos Gradín, 2013. "Conditional occupational segregation of minorities in the US," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, pages 473-493.
    5. Coral del Rio & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2014. "The Evolution of Occupational Segregation in the U.S., 1940-2010: The Gains and Losses of Gender-Race/Ethnicity Groups," Working Papers 323, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    6. Filipski, Mateusz & Edward Taylor, J. & Msangi, Siwa, 2011. "Effects of Free Trade on Women and Immigrants: CAFTA and the Rural Dominican Republic," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 1862-1877.
    7. Coral Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2015. "The Evolution of Occupational Segregation in the United States, 1940–2010: Gains and Losses of Gender–Race/Ethnicity Groups," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(3), pages 967-988, June.
    8. Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2016. "Occupational Achievements by Sexual Orientation in the U.S.: Are There Differences Among Races?," Working Papers 1604, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada.

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