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Occupational segregation of Hispanics in US metropolitan areas

  • O. Alonso-Villar
  • C. Gradín
  • C. del Río

This article quantifies the occupational segregation of Hispanics in the largest Hispanic enclaves of the US. Using a procedure based on propensity score, it explores the role played by the characteristics of Hispanics, such as country of origin and English fluency, in explaining the variation of segregation across metropolitan areas. Regarding the characteristics of the metropolitan areas, a regression analysis shows that the segregation of Hispanic workers tends to be higher in relatively smaller and highly educated labour markets, with a lower proportion of Hispanics, a higher growth of recent foreign-born Hispanics and in areas where they face cooler feelings from the rest of the population.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/00036846.2013.778951
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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 45 (2013)
Issue (Month): 30 (October)
Pages: 4298-4307

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:45:y:2013:i:30:p:4298-4307
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  1. Randy P. Albelda, 1986. "Occupational segregation by race and gender, 1958û1981," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 39(3), pages 404-411, April.
  2. Patrick Bayer & Robert McMillan & Kim Rueben, 2002. "What Drives Racial Segregation? New Evidence Using Census Microdata," Working Papers 02-26, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  3. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jacob L. Vigdor, 2008. "Is the Melting Pot Still Hot? Explaining the Resurgence of Immigrant Segregation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(3), pages 478-497, August.
  4. Carlos Gradín & Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2011. "Occupational segregation by race and ethnicity in the US: Differences across states," Working Papers 190, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  5. Frédéric CHANTREUIL & Alain TRANNOY, 2011. "Inequality Decomposition Values," Annales d'Economie et de Statistique, ENSAE, issue 101-102, pages 13-36.
  6. Olga Alonso-Villar & Coral del Río, 2008. "Local versus overall segregation measures," Working Papers 0802, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada.
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