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Occupational segregation of Hispanics in US metropolitan areas

Author

Listed:
  • O. Alonso-Villar
  • C. Gradín
  • C. del Río

Abstract

This article quantifies the occupational segregation of Hispanics in the largest Hispanic enclaves of the US. Using a procedure based on propensity score, it explores the role played by the characteristics of Hispanics, such as country of origin and English fluency, in explaining the variation of segregation across metropolitan areas. Regarding the characteristics of the metropolitan areas, a regression analysis shows that the segregation of Hispanic workers tends to be higher in relatively smaller and highly educated labour markets, with a lower proportion of Hispanics, a higher growth of recent foreign-born Hispanics and in areas where they face cooler feelings from the rest of the population.

Suggested Citation

  • O. Alonso-Villar & C. Gradín & C. del Río, 2013. "Occupational segregation of Hispanics in US metropolitan areas," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(30), pages 4298-4307, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:45:y:2013:i:30:p:4298-4307
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2013.778951
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jacob L. Vigdor, 2008. "Is the Melting Pot Still Hot? Explaining the Resurgence of Immigrant Segregation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(3), pages 478-497, August.
    2. Katharine L. Bradbury, 2002. "Education and wages in the 1980s and 1990s: are all groups moving up together?," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 1, pages 19-46.
    3. Barry T. Hirsch & David A. Macpherson, 2004. "Wages, Sorting on Skill, and the Racial Composition of Jobs," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(1), pages 189-210, January.
    4. F. Chantreuil & A. Trannoy, 1999. "Inequality decomposition values : the trade-off between marginality and consistency," THEMA Working Papers 99-24, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    5. repec:adr:anecst:y:2011:i:101-102:p:02 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Bayer, Patrick & McMillan, Robert & Rueben, Kim S., 2004. "What drives racial segregation? New evidence using Census microdata," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 514-535, November.
    7. Alonso-Villar, Olga & del Río, Coral, 2010. "Local versus overall segregation measures," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 30-38, July.
    8. Carlos Gradín & Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2011. "Occupational segregation by race and ethnicity in the US: Differences across states," Working Papers 190, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    9. John Logan & Brian Stults & Reynolds Farley, 2004. "Segregation of minorities in the metropolis: two decades of change," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 41(1), pages 1-22, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Rodríguez, Miguel & Pena-Boquete, Yolanda & Pardo-Fernández, Juan Carlos, 2016. "Revisiting Environmental Kuznets Curves through the energy price lens," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 32-41.
    2. Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2014. "The Evolution of Occupational Segregation in the U.S., 1940-2010: Gains and Losses of Gender- Race/ethnicity Groups," Working Papers 1405, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada.
    3. Joshua C. Hall & Brad R. Humphreys & Jane E. Ruseski, 2015. "Economic Freedom, Race, and Health Disparities: Evidence from US States," Working Papers 15-43, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    4. Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2018. "Social Welfare Losses Due to Occupational Segregation by Gender and Race/Ethnicity in the U.S.: Are There Differences across Regions?," Working Papers 1802, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada.
    5. Coral del Rio & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2014. "The Evolution of Occupational Segregation in the U.S., 1940-2010: The Gains and Losses of Gender-Race/Ethnicity Groups," Working Papers 323, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    6. Coral Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2015. "The Evolution of Occupational Segregation in the United States, 1940–2010: Gains and Losses of Gender–Race/Ethnicity Groups," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(3), pages 967-988, June.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

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