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Occupational Segregation Measures: A Role for Status

  • Coral del Río
  • Olga Alonso-Villar

This paper defines local segregation measures which are sensible to status differences among organizational units. So far as we know, this is the first time that status-sensitive segregation measures are offered in a multigroup context by invoking a cardinal measure of status. These measures allow aggregating employment gaps of a target group penalizing its concentration in low-status occupations. They are intended to complement, rather than substitute, previous local segregation measures. The usefulness of these tools is illustrated in the case of occupational segregation by race and ethnicity in the U.S.

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Paper provided by Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada in its series Working Papers with number 1103.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:vig:wpaper:1103
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  1. Olga Alonso Villar & Coral del Río, 2010. "Segregation of female and male workers in Spain: occupations and industries," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 194(3), pages 91-121, June.
  2. Randy P. Albelda, 1986. "Occupational segregation by race and gender, 1958û1981," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 39(3), pages 404-411, April.
  3. Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2012. "Occupational Segregation of Immigrant Women in Spain," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(2), pages 91-123, June.
  4. Robert Hutchens, 2004. "One Measure of Segregation," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 45(2), pages 555-578, 05.
  5. David Card & Jesse Rothstein, 2006. "Racial Segregation and the Black-White Test Score Gap," NBER Working Papers 12078, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Coral Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2010. "Gender Segregation in the Spanish Labor Market: An Alternative Approach," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 98(2), pages 337-362, September.
  7. Alonso-Villar, Olga & del Río, Coral, 2010. "Local versus overall segregation measures," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 30-38, July.
  8. Vigdor, Jacob L. & Glaeser, Edward & Cutler, David, 2008. "Is the Melting Pot Still Hot? Explaining the Resurgence of Immigrant Segregation," Scholarly Articles 2664275, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  9. Cristina Fernández & Carolina Ortega, 2008. "Labor market assimilation of immigrants in Spain: employment at the expense of bad job-matches?," Spanish Economic Review, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 83-107, June.
  10. Chakravarty, Satya R. & Silber, Jacques, 2007. "A generalized index of employment segregation," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 185-195, March.
  11. Judith Hellerstein & David Neumark, 2006. "Workplace Segregation in the United States: Race, Ethnicity, and Skill," Working Papers 060710, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics.
  12. Liu, Pak-Wai & Zhang, Junsen & Chong, Shu-Chuen, 2004. "Occupational segregation and wage differentials between natives and immigrants: evidence from Hong Kong," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 395-413, February.
  13. Frankel, David M. & Volij, Oscar, 2010. "Measuring Segregation," Staff General Research Papers 32130, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  14. Jaai Parasnis, 2006. "Segregation In The Australian Labour Market ," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(4), pages 318-332, December.
  15. Silber, Jacques G., 1989. "On the measurement of employment segregation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 237-243, September.
  16. Boisso, Dale & Hayes, Kathy & Hirschberg, Joseph & Silber, Jacques, 1994. "Occupational segregation in the multidimensional case : Decomposition and tests of significance," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 161-171, March.
  17. Pascale Joassart-Marcelli, 2009. "The Spatial Determinants Of Wage Inequality: Evidence From Recent Latina Immigrants In Southern California," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 33-72.
  18. Frankel, David M. & Volij, Oscar, 2011. "Measuring School Segregation," Staff General Research Papers 35115, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  19. Silber, Jacques, 1992. "Occupational Segregation Indices in the Multidimensional Case: A Note," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 68(202), pages 276-77, September.
  20. M. Fleurbaey & A. Trannoy, 2000. "The Impossibility of a Paretian Egalitarian," THEMA Working Papers 2000-26, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
  21. Hutchens, Robert M., 1991. "Segregation curves, Lorenz curves, and inequality in the distribution of people across occupations," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 31-51, February.
  22. Olga Alonso-Villar & Coral del Río & Carlos Gradín, 2010. "The extent of occupational segregation in the US: Differences by race, ethnicity, and gender," Working Papers 180, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  23. Karmel, T & Maclachlan, M, 1988. "Occupational Sex Segregation--Increasing or Decreasing?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 64(186), pages 187-95, September.
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