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Complements or substitutes? Task specialization by gender and nativity in Spain

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  • Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina
  • de la Rica, Sara

Abstract

Learning about the impact of immigration on the labor market outcomes of natives is a topic of major concern for immigrant-receiving countries. Using data from Spain, where the immigrant population has risen from 4% to 13% within a decade, we find that immigration appears to have affected the task specialization of natives without affecting their employment levels. However, the impact of immigration on the relative task supply of natives is twice as great in Spain as in the United States. The magnitude of the immigration impact in a country with a large share of immigrants originating from Spanish-speaking countries suggests that host country language proficiency is not the sole factor driving the observed impact. Additionally, the analysis reveals significant gender differences in the impact of immigration on the relative task supply of natives, possibly resting on the occupational concentration of immigrants and native occupational segregation patterns by gender, among other factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & de la Rica, Sara, 2011. "Complements or substitutes? Task specialization by gender and nativity in Spain," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 697-707, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:18:y:2011:i:5:p:697-707
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration Task specialization Gender segregation Comparative advantage Occupational mobility;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • R13 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General Equilibrium and Welfare Economic Analysis of Regional Economies

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