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Recent trends in occupational segregation by gender: a look across the Atlantic

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  • Dolado, Juan José
  • Felgueroso, Florentino
  • Jimeno, Juan F.

Abstract

In this paper, we analyse the recent patterns of occupational segregation by gender in the EU countries vis-á-vis the US. Given the lack of long time-series data on homogeneous LFS data about occupations and educational attainments for male and female workers in EU countries, we use a single cross section corresponding to 1999 as the basis of comparison, hoping to uncover covergence trends by examining whether the EU-Us differentials in gender occupational segregation decline across age cohorts. The main findings of our study are: (i) gender segregation has been declining across age cohorts in the case of female graduates and has remained steady for those with lower educational levels; in particular, the level ot segregation for the former group is higher in the EU than in the US; (ii) gender segregation seems to be positively correlated with the share of part-time jobs; and (iii) there is some evidence, albeit a weak one, that the gender wage gap and occupational segregation are positively correlated, particularly when the Scandinavian countries are excluded from the sample.

Suggested Citation

  • Dolado, Juan José & Felgueroso, Florentino & Jimeno, Juan F., 2002. "Recent trends in occupational segregation by gender: a look across the Atlantic," UC3M Working papers. Economics we023011, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
  • Handle: RePEc:cte:werepe:we023011
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hélène Perivier, 2007. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux États-Unis - Une mise en perspective avec la France et la Suède," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2007-07, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    2. Ricardo Mora & Javier Ruiz-Castillo, 2004. "Gender segregation by occupations in the public and the private sector.The case of Spain," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 28(3), pages 399-428, September.
    3. Juan D. Barón & Deborah A. Cobb-Clark, 2010. "Occupational Segregation and the Gender Wage Gap in Private- and Public-Sector Employment: A Distributional Analysis," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(273), pages 227-246, June.
    4. Hélène Périvier, 2008. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux États-Unis," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2008-12, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    5. Budria, Santiago, 2006. "Education and Inequality: Evidence from Spain," MPRA Paper 1098, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Claudia Olivetti, 2008. "Gender and the Labour Market: An International Perspective and the Case of Italy," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 98(3), pages 3-32, May-June.
    7. Antecol, Heather & Cobb-Clark, Deborah A., 2013. "Do psychosocial traits help explain gender segregation in young people's occupations?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 59-73.
    8. Rao K, Surekha & Jaireth, Sushma & K K, Seethamma, 2006. "International perspectives on Gender, science and Development," MPRA Paper 2630, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Barbara Petrongolo, 2004. "Gender Segregation in Employment Contracts," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 2(2-3), pages 331-345, 04/05.
    10. Alena Bicakova & Stepan Jurajda, 2014. "The Quiet Revolution and the Family: Gender Composition of Tertiary Education and Early Fertility Patterns," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp504, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    11. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & de la Rica, Sara, 2011. "Complements or substitutes? Task specialization by gender and nativity in Spain," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 697-707, October.
    12. Jurajda, Stepan & Harmgart, Heike, 2007. "When do female occupations pay more?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 170-187, March.
    13. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/6142 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Yelena Takhtamanova & Eva Sierminska, 2009. "Gender, Monetary Policy, and Employment: The Case of Nine OECD Countries," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 323-353.
    15. Andrén, Daniela & Andrén, Thomas, 2007. "Occupational Gender Composition and Wages in Romania: From Planned Equality to Market Inequality?," IZA Discussion Papers 3152, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    16. Mario Izquierdo & Aitor Lacuesta, 2006. "Wage inequality in Spain: recent developments," Working Papers 0615, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    17. Ana Carolina Ortega Masagué, 2006. "El diferencial entre las tasas de desempleo de hombres y mujeres en Argentina," Working Papers 2006-08, FEDEA.
    18. Valentova, Marie & Krizova, Iva & Katrnak, Tomas, 2007. "Occupational Gender Segregation in the light of the Segregation in Education: A Cross-National Comparison," IRISS Working Paper Series 2007-04, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD.
    19. Hélène Périvier, 2009. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux États-Unis. Évolutions mises en perspective avec celles de la France et de la Suède," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 0(1), pages 49-84.
    20. Paweł Strawiński & Aleksandra Majchrowska & Paulina Broniatowska, 2016. "Zmiany struktury zatrudnienia kobiet w Polsce w latach 2000–2013," Gospodarka Narodowa, Warsaw School of Economics, issue 1, pages 73-97.
    21. Štìpán Jurajda & Michal Franta, 2007. "Occupational Gender Segregation in the Czech Republic (in English)," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 57(5-6), pages 255-271, August.
    22. Antecol, Heather & Cobb-Clark, Deborah A., 2010. "Do Non-Cognitive Skills Help Explain the Occupational Segregation of Young People?," IZA Discussion Papers 5093, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    23. Zuleika Ferré & Máximo Rossi, 2002. "Segregación ocupacional de la mujer en el mercado de trabajo del Uruguay (1986-1997)," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 0502, Department of Economics - dECON.
    24. Frederic Tournemaine, 2008. "Social aspirations and choice of fertility: why can status motive reduce per-capita growth?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(1), pages 49-66, January.
    25. Dueñas, Diego & Iglesias, Carlos & Llorente, Raquel, 2014. "Do services reduce gender inequality in labor markets? The service sector, knnowledge-intensive services and the gender pay gap," MPRA Paper 61628, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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