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Over-education and Gender Occupational Differences in Spain

Listed author(s):
  • Inmaculada García-Mainar
  • Guillermo García-Martín
  • Víctor Montuenga

    ()

This paper explores the role of over-education in shaping the negative relationship between the education level attained by employees and the fact of working in a gender-dominated occupation, in Spain, a country where the phenomenon of over-education is common. Applying multinomial logit regressions, and controlling for individual and job characteristics, the results confirm the typical finding that having a university degree decreases the odds of working in a gender-dominated occupation. However, this is only true in the case of women when considering long—more than 3 years—university studies. The evidence also suggests that the general spread of over-education in Spain weakens that relationship so that reducing over-education would eventually lead to more uniformity in the gender-distribution of employment across occupations. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11205-014-0811-7
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Social Indicators Research.

Volume (Year): 124 (2015)
Issue (Month): 3 (December)
Pages: 807-833

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Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:124:y:2015:i:3:p:807-833
DOI: 10.1007/s11205-014-0811-7
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com

Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11135

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