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On-the-Job Search in a Matching Model with Heterogeneous Jobs and Workers

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  • Dolado, Juan J.
  • Jansen, Marcel
  • Jimeno, Juan F

Abstract

This paper considers a matching model with heterogeneous jobs (unskilled and skilled) and workers (low- and high-educated) which allows for on-the-job search by mismatched workers. The latter are high-educated workers who transitorily accept unskilled jobs and continue to search for skilled jobs. Our findings show that on-the-job search introduces an additional source of between- and within-group wage inequality. Furthermore, the higher quit rate of mismatched workers exerts a negative externality on unskilled jobs and weakens the labour market position of low-educated workers. This last feature changes the effects of skill-biased technological change and it alters the response of the labour market to shifts in the skill distribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Dolado, Juan J. & Jansen, Marcel & Jimeno, Juan F, 2003. "On-the-Job Search in a Matching Model with Heterogeneous Jobs and Workers," CEPR Discussion Papers 4094, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:4094
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    job search; skills; unemployment; wage inequality;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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