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On the Job Search and the Wage Distribution

Author

Listed:
  • Bent Jesper Christensen

    (University of Aarhus)

  • Rasmus Lentz

    (Boston University)

  • Dale T. Mortensen

    (Northwestern University)

  • George R. Neumann

    (University of Iowa)

  • Axel Werwatz

    (Geman Institute for Economic Research, Berlin)

Abstract

Estimates of the structural parameters of a job separation model derived from the theory of on-the-job search are reported in this paper. Given that each employer pays the same wage to observably equivalent workers but wages are dispersed across employers, the theory implies that an employer's separation flow is the sum of an exogenous outflow unrelated to the wage paid and a job-to-job flow that decreases with the employer's wage. The specification estimated allows worker search effort to depend on the wage currently earned. The empirical results imply that search effort declines with the wage paid, as the theory predicts, using Danish IDA data for the years 1994-1995. Furthermore, the estimates for the full sample and four occupational sub-samples explain the employment effect, defined as the horizontal difference between the distribution of wages earned and the distribution of wages offered.

Suggested Citation

  • Bent Jesper Christensen & Rasmus Lentz & Dale T. Mortensen & George R. Neumann & Axel Werwatz, 2003. "On the Job Search and the Wage Distribution," CAM Working Papers 2004-09, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kud:kuieca:2004_09
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    File URL: http://www.econ.ku.dk/cam/wp0910/wp0203/2004-09.pdf/
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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