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Wage Returns to Experience and Tenure for Young Men in Italy

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  • G. Sulis

Abstract

This paper provides estimates of wage returns to experience, firm, sector and occupation specific tenure for a sample of young Italian male workers. By comparing returns obtained using different estimators, I evaluate the importance of endogeneity and selection problems generated by specific unobserved components and individual fixed effects. After controlling for the role of collective bargaining agreements and occupation categories, results indicate that general labour market experience is the fundamental source of wage growth for blue and white collars, while returns to firm tenure are insignificant. There is some evidence of positive returns to sector and occupational tenure for white collars. Estimates from different sectors suggest that union coverage can be relevant in offsetting the role of search and matching in wage determination.

Suggested Citation

  • G. Sulis, 2009. "Wage Returns to Experience and Tenure for Young Men in Italy," Working Paper CRENoS 200903, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
  • Handle: RePEc:cns:cnscwp:200903
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    Cited by:

    1. Giorgio d'Agostino & Michele Raitano & Margherita Scarlato, 2022. "Job mobility and heterogeneous returns to apprenticeship training in Italy," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 60(2), pages 391-423, June.
    2. Jørn Rattsø & Hildegunn E.Stokke, 2018. "Dynamic private-public wage gap: Return to experience, education level and cit effect," Working Paper Series 17518, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    3. Paola Gritti & Riccardo Leoni, 2013. "The impact on wages of generic competencies, psychological capital, new work practices and digital technologies," Working Papers (2013-) 1301, University of Bergamo, Department of Management, Economics and Quantitative Methods.
    4. Riccardo Leoni, 2012. "Workplace Design, Complementarities among Work Practices, and the Formation of Key Competencies: Evidence from Italian Employees," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 65(2), pages 316-349, April.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    unions; endogeneity; search; skills; wages; italy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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