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Spatial Mismatch, Immigrant Networks, And Hispanic Employment In The United States

  • Judith K. Hellerstein

    ()

    (Department of Economics and MPRC,University of Maryland)

  • Melissa P. McInerney

    ()

    (Department of Economics, College of William and Mary)

  • David Neumark

    ()

    (Department of Economics, UCI, NBER, and IZA)

We study the relationship between Hispanic employment and location-specific measures of the distribution of jobs. We find that it is only the local density of jobs held by Hispanics that matters for Hispanic employment, that measures of local job density defined for Hispanic poor English speakers or immigrants are more important, and that the density of jobs held by Hispanic poor English speakers are most important for the employment of these less-skilled Hispanics than for other Hispanics. This evidence is consistent with labor market networks being an important influence on the employment of less-skilled Hispanics, as is evidence from other sources. We also find that in MSAs where the growth rates of the Hispanic immigrant population have been highest, which are also MSAs with historically low Hispanic populations, localized job density for low-skilled jobs is even more important for Hispanic employment than in the full sample. We interpret this evidence as consistent with the importance of labor market networks, as strong labor market networks are likely to have been especially important in inducing Hispanics to migrate, and because of these networks employment in these “new immigrant” cities is especially strongly tied to the local availability of jobs.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, College of William and Mary in its series Working Papers with number 100.

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Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: 18 Oct 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cwm:wpaper:100
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