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Job accessibility and welfare usage: Evidence from Los Angeles

Author

Listed:
  • Evelyn Blumenberg

    (School of Public Policy and Social Research, University of California, Los Angeles)

  • Paul Ong

    (School of Public Policy and Social Research, University of California, Los Angeles)

Abstract

Previous scholars have explored the effects of local labor market conditions on welfare usage. However, none of these studies use direct measures of geographic access to nearby jobs. Responding to this limitation, our research combines data from the 1990 census with three administrative data sets to examine the effect of geographic job access-defined as the relative supply of low-wage jobs located within a three-mile radius of a census tract-on welfare usage rates among the Los Angeles population with a high school degree or less. After controlling for other characteristics likely to affect welfare behavior, we find that welfare usage declines as geographic job access increases. This relationship holds not only among African-Americans, the subject of much of the scholarship on job access and economic opportunity, but also among whites, Asians, and Hispanics.

Suggested Citation

  • Evelyn Blumenberg & Paul Ong, 1998. "Job accessibility and welfare usage: Evidence from Los Angeles," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(4), pages 639-657.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:17:y:1998:i:4:p:639-657
    DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1520-6688(199823)17:4<639::AID-PAM3>3.0.CO;2-R
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hilary Williamson Hoynes, 2000. "Local Labor Markets And Welfare Spells: Do Demand Conditions Matter?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(3), pages 351-368, August.
    2. J. J. McCall, 1970. "Economics of Information and Job Search," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(1), pages 113-126.
    3. John M. Fitzgerald, 1995. "Local labor markets and local area effects on welfare duration," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(1), pages 43-67.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cervero, Robert & Sandoval, Onésimo & Landis, John, 2000. "Transportation as a Stimulus to Welfare-to-Work: Private Versus Public Mobility," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt9q97b1tp, University of California Transportation Center.
    2. Antonio Páez & Steven Farber, 2012. "Participation and desire: leisure activities among Canadian adults with disabilities," Transportation, Springer, vol. 39(6), pages 1055-1078, November.
    3. Ong, Paul M. & Miller, Douglas, 2003. "Spatial and Transportation Mismatch in Los Angeles," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt2664v2n7, University of California Transportation Center.
    4. Naomi F. Sugie & Michael C. Lens, 2017. "Daytime Locations in Spatial Mismatch: Job Accessibility and Employment at Reentry From Prison," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(2), pages 775-800, April.
    5. Judith K. Hellerstein & Melissa Mcinerney & David Neumark, 2010. "Spatial Mismatch, Immigrant Networks, and Hispanic Employment in the United States," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 99-100, pages 141-167.
    6. Ong, Paul & Miller, Douglas, 2003. "Spatial and Transportation Mismatch in Los Angeles," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt1m84h1b7, University of California Transportation Center.
    7. Gurley, Tami & Bruce, Donald, 2005. "The effects of car access on employment outcomes for welfare recipients," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 250-272, September.
    8. Blumenberg, Evelyn A., 2003. "En-gendering Effective Planning: Spatial Mismatch, Low-Income Women, and Transportation Policy," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7kc7v38f, University of California Transportation Center.
    9. Blumenberg, Evelyn, 2003. "En-gendering Effective Planning: Spatial Mismatch, Low-Income Women, and Transportation Policy," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt20m3505v, University of California Transportation Center.
    10. Ong, Paul M. & Houston, Douglas & Horton, John & Shaw, Linda L, 2002. "Los Angeles County Calworks Transportation Needs Assessment," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt04861347, University of California Transportation Center.
    11. Blumenberg, Evelyn & Moga, Steven & Ong, Paul M., 1998. "Getting Welfare Recipients to Work: Transportation and Welfare Reform, Summary of Conference Proceedings," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt23s208dz, University of California Transportation Center.
    12. Zhou, Jiangping & Wang, Yin & Schweitzer, Lisa, 2012. "Jobs/housing balance and employer-based travel demand management program returns to scale: Evidence from Los Angeles," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 22-35.
    13. Michael A. Stoll & Harry J. Holzer & Keith R. Ihlanfeldt, 2000. "Within cities and suburbs: Racial residential concentration and the spatial distribution of employment opportunities across sub-metropolitan areas," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(2), pages 207-231.
    14. Paul M. Ong & Michael A. Stoll, 2007. "Redlining or risk? A spatial analysis of auto insurance rates in Los Angeles," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(4), pages 811-830.
    15. Baum, Charles L., 2009. "The effects of vehicle ownership on employment," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 151-163, November.
    16. Paul M. Ong, 2002. "Car ownership and welfare-to-work," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(2), pages 239-252.

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