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Recent immigrants as labor market arbitrageurs: Evidence from the minimum wage

  • Cadena, Brian C.

This paper investigates the local labor supply effects of changes to the minimum wage by examining the response of low-skilled immigrants’ location decisions. Canonical models emphasize the importance of labor mobility when evaluating the employment effects of the minimum wage; yet few studies address this outcome directly. Low-skilled immigrant populations shift toward labor markets with stagnant minimum wages, and this result is robust to a number of alternative interpretations. This mobility provides behavior-based evidence in favor of a non-trivial negative employment effect of the minimum wage. Further, it reduces the estimated demand elasticity using teens; employment losses among native teens are substantially larger in states that have historically attracted few immigrant residents.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Urban Economics.

Volume (Year): 80 (2014)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 1-12

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Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:80:y:2014:i:c:p:1-12
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622905

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